6 Responses

  1. Nina Iya
    Nina Iya at |

    what about the UNKNOWN HEROES of GAZA’s genocide

    Reply
    1. Michael Haltman
      Michael Haltman at |

      The known anti-hero of that crisis is Hamas who uses other Palestinians as human shields!

      http://politicsandfinance.blogspot.com/2014/08/photo-you-likely-have-never-seen-father.html

      Reply
  2. Daniel Koziarski
    Daniel Koziarski at |

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3zef_and_Wiktoria_Ulma These people are worth mentioning too. Their history is exceptionally tragic.

    Reply
  3. ivy
    ivy at |

    nice heroes they helped so many jewih people

    Reply
  4. noone important
    noone important at |

    Few remarks:
    Kolbe – although it doesn’t make his sacrifice any smaller, it is a good example that history is rarely as simple as we may see it. Before the war, Kolbe was known as catholic extremist, nationalist and anti-semite. A true irony is that he died as a hero in a place were so many Jews lost there lives.
    Pecherskyi – ” He was imprisoned in a gulag until Stalin’s death” – it is actually quite common to write and say that someone was imprisoned in gulag (or even gulags) but it doesn’t make it any less a mistake. The GULag – Main Directorate of the Camps was a department at the NKVD (and later – MVD, although the name was changed at some point after the war) that was responsible for running the camps. One could have been imprisoned in a camp superised by the GULag, but not in GULag. The confusion probably comes from the misunderstanding of Solzhenitsyn’s “Gulag Archipelago”.
    Pilecki – although undoubtedly one of the bravest people ever lived, after the war he was technically a spy (no matter how noble his reasons were) and he would have received the same sentence anywhere in the world at that time, although he should have been pardoned because of his war-time activity, and this is where the true wrongdoing of the post-war government lies. But it should be noted, that he specificaly requested that nobody asked for pardon in his name. It has also been proven that he was not tortured after his arrest – the ivestigation was quick and clear. It has not been dicovered why, but some say that there was a persuasion from the state security showing him that his actions could have been seen differently (unlikely) or that there has been a double agent in his network.
    Also worth noting is that although they never met, he was in Auschwitz at the same time as Jozef Cyrankiewcz, who also organised the in-camp underground, though unaware of Pilecki’s cell, also sending messages outside the camp. Quite ironically, Cyrankiewicz lived on to be the longest-ruling prime minister in Poland after the war.

    Reply
  5. matt meier
    matt meier at |

    yall we need some real heroes like soldiers. america and the allies won the war so thank them not just civilians that helped jews.

    Reply

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