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18 Responses

  1. auto devis at |

    The more you know the more scared you are lol

    Reply
  2. jgood at |

    its a shame that people do not know how to interperet research and information properly. a single journal or anecdotal evidence is not proof. vacciens have to go through stringent tests and are constantly re-tested to make sure they are as safe as possible. those people who think vaccines are dangerous should compare child disability and death rates from today to even 50 years ago.

    i wonder how proud the ‘proud parents of unvaccinated children’ will be when the child catches measles and goes blind

    Reply
  3. 5minutes at |

    Oh, Lord…

    First – I love the picture that has the skull and crossbones and the note that our precious little chil’uns get 46 doses before age 6 – when the list shows just over 30 doses, most of them flu shots that are recommended for everyone. The rest are vaccines that have been developed since 1980 that protect against things like hepatitis, pneumonia, chickenpox, meningitis, whooping cough, and severe diarrhea – along with booster shots to increase immunity to those diseases that can, you know, potentially kill people.

    In 2005, there was an outbreak of measles in Indiana, and you’d probably never guess that the kids who got the measles were the children of parents who refused to vaccinate them. That’s right – shock of shocks: the kids who got the measles vaccine didn’t catch a potentially fatal disease. This is because vaccines protect people from disease and stop outbreaks. In 2012, 2 measles-infected disease factories who’d never had the vaccine (shock) walked around the Super Bowl, and because of the wide prevalence of the measles vaccine only 14 people – who also had never been vaccinated – caught the disease.

    I’ll put it simply: if you refuse to vaccinate your child, then you are responsible if they get disease and die. Don’t be stupid conspiracy theorists: vaccinate your children. And yourself.

    Reply
    1. Aron at |

      Hear, hear! The anti-vax crowd are a danger to society, and should be treated as such.

      Reply
    2. Sen at |

      Fair enough, though, that’s assuming that you have not had an adverse (allergic) reaction to a vaccine.

      I, Personally have had only one vaccine in my life I had the MMR vaccine and I had a sever allergic reaction. Luckily I had the vaccine administered in the hospital and was able to stay there and receive treatment. Because of such a sever reaction it would be too high of a risk for me to take anymore vaccines. In such a situation I would consider it perfectly reasonable to not take anymore vaccines, just as someone allergic to penicillin does not take penicillin, the risks outweigh the benefits.

      The big question for me is will the risks, a history of sever allergic reactions to vaccines, outweigh the benefits with my children, I don’t know yet. But If I do have a child like me severely allergic I won’t continue to vaccinate them it would be irresponsible. I see kids who get that and as uncommon as it is kids die from parents who are so afraid of not vaccinating their kids that they ignore serious allergic reactions.

      Reply
  4. Karter at |

    The tittle and the context… Its misconceptions not risks… Im kinda confused

    Reply
    1. TopTenz Master at |

      We added misconception to the title.

      Reply
  5. David at |

    Hmmmm. Who should I trust? Dozens of scientists and researchers with medical degrees who claim there is little to no risk when getting vaccinated. Or you and a chick famous for showing her boobs and acting stupid. Unless you went to school for 8 years to learn exactly about this stuff, you don’t get an opinion. Oh, and looking up a couple of articles on the internet doesn’t count as “research”.

    Reply
    1. TopTenz Master at |

      We published this article in the interest of giving information. I personally believe that vaccinations are good (I get a flu shot every year). My wife, a nurse, gives them out. But no one can argue that there are risks involved and that is the message. We are not intending to encourage or discourage vaccinations – that is a decision for each person or family to make. Of course, if I suspected my children had been potentially affected by a vaccination I would have a much stronger opinion on stopping their usage. But so far I, thankfully, have not had to deal with any such tragedies.

      Reply
      1. Simon at |

        I didn’t know you were supposed to get flu shots every year…. Uh oh

        Reply
        1. Aron at |

          There’s still time, though you won’t die if you get the flu. Just really unpleasant.

          Unless you’re old, young, asthmatic, or a combination of the three.

          Yes, old, young, AND asthmatic.

          Reply
  6. jgood at |

    i actually think this is an irresponsible list and does nothing but add credence to anti-vaccination wackos unfounded arguments. this in’t a question of difference of opinions, its science. the article doesnt clearly explain that the risks of not getting vaccinated heavily outweigh the ‘risks’ of getting vaccinated. it should be removed

    Reply
  7. Becca at |

    I’m really bothered by all the “possible misconceptions” on this list. They’re not possible they’re definite misconceptions. All of these have been thoroughly tested and all research shows that vaccines have no effect on autism, the thoimersal in vaccines was not dangerous, and having multiple vaccines do not weaken your child’s immune system

    Reply
  8. george at |

    So I should blindly trust studies funded by the companies that are making boo-koo instead of studies by doctors and scientists who aren’t and get labeled frauds?

    Reply
    1. Aron at |

      No, what you should do is read the studies.

      You will see that the fraudulent studies are indeed fraudulent.

      But first, you must admit that there are people out there smarter than yourself. And you are completely and utterly wrong about vaccines.

      Please have your children vaccinated, for their sake and my sake. It is the responsible thing to do.

      Reply
      1. george at |

        I’ve read a lot and had plenty of people smarter than me tell me it’s not necessary to get them. Why are there no mandatory vaccines? Feel free to inject formaldehyde and mercury as well a cocktail of other questionable ingredients into your bod.

        But also, you must admit that there are people even smarter than yourself. And you are completely and utterly wrong about vaccines or you might not be because, as you pointed out, those smarter than me are the ones doing the research. But far be it from me to blindly accept being injected with poisons from companies with interests of capital gain and blocking many studies that aren’t in their favor.

        It is not only irresponsible to trust biased studies but I remember hating shots as a kid, so it’s also pretty cruel, Aron.

        Reply

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