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13 Responses

  1. Sterling Mallory Archer
    Sterling Mallory Archer at |

    #10 is already happening in Alberta, we are soon to have a $15 minimum wage. Self service tills have been set up at the grocery stores near me, where there was none before two months ago. Most of the McDonalds I have seen have those order computers set up as well.

    Reply
    1. norm
      norm at |

      That’s canadian dollars.

      Reply
  2. KLD
    KLD at |

    I actually think that increasing to $15 would be fine for certain businesses. You just cannot do this to the mom and pop store, restaurant, etc. An increase like this would absolutely run them out of business. My thought is that any business with more than, say, 20 employees would need to raise wages. Corporations like Walmart, absolutely. They can raise prices a bit to make up the per hour increase. Fast food eateries can do the same. This can work but not on a widespread, 100% roll out.

    Reply
  3. JLac
    JLac at |

    The only people who really benefit from minimum wage hikes are politicians. Inflation would instantly make $15 worth what $8 dollars is worth now anyways. People making minimum wage would be in the exact same situation as before, people making more than minimum wage would become less wealthy. However, we would all pay more sales tax, more income tax, more employment tax, etc. The government wins, everybody else loses.

    Reply
    1. The Annoyed Elephant
      The Annoyed Elephant at |

      Exactly. As I said a little further down, the biggest error in the minimum wage debate is the belief that our economy is built on the dollar, when in truth, it is built on value – the value of currency, goods, resources, and workers. Falsely inflating the value of one group will only result in the other groups being falsely inflated over time.

      Reply
  4. FoonTheElder
    FoonTheElder at |

    What a load of fact free shit. Adjusted for inflation, the minimum wage would be about $11 per hour.

    Reply
    1. Doctor Jim
      Doctor Jim at |

      Wrong!!! It would be $4.63. The minimum wage started in 1933 at $0.25 an hour.

      Reply
  5. SunnyDandThePurpleStuff
    SunnyDandThePurpleStuff at |

    Im against it more than before, good article

    Reply
  6. Collette Spalding
    Collette Spalding at |

    balderdash

    Reply
  7. Michael Nelson
    Michael Nelson at |

    Don’t forget that with an increase in the minimum wage, inflation would also rise. Even large corporations have to make money to cover that doubling in pay. Today your value meal is $6 and after the pay hike you can get the same food for $14. Your new payrate is worth about the same as your old one.

    Reply
    1. The Annoyed Elephant
      The Annoyed Elephant at |

      Excellent point. Let’s put out this description as well:

      OK. Let’s start by saying that one day, the minimum wage goes up to $15 an hour. Now, all the high-school graduates with their first jobs working the cash registers at Kmart who started at $9 an hour are making the same as the people who’ve been there for 15 years who were making $12 an hour. What do you do to those longer-term workers, since they have more skills, but cost more? Do you raise them to $18 an hour to cover the difference, because that’s only fair, although it will certainly have the inflationary effect Michael spoke of?

      The answer is no. What you do is you first your unskilled workers and then raise the skilled workers to $15-16 an hour. The graduates will just have to sit at home with mom and dad until they gain more skills – skills they’ll never gain because no one is going to hire them at that level. Kinda like how the economy works now.

      Meanwhile the increase in costs is driving inflation, and within a couple of years, $15 an hour isn’t enough to live on anymore, and people start pushing for $20 an hour.

      The reason for this is because our economy is not actually based on dollar figures. It’s based on value: the value of a product, the value of an idea, and in this case, the value of a worker. Falsely inflating their value by increasing the minimum wage has not changed the value of that employee – it’s only shifted the numbers around for a short-term boost, increasing the likelihood of long-term problems. Once the market catches up, things will go back to the way they were, except that you’ve increased unemployment.

      Reply
      1. FoonTheElder
        FoonTheElder at |

        The vast majority of people working for minimum wages are not single students just out of high school, but working parents who have families to support.

        All that corporate America has done in the past 40 years is to race to the lowest wages possible while making sure that they eliminate any competition that will lower their profits. That is why St. Ronnie and his successors have basically eliminated any anti-trust rules, which has allowed all of the big corporations to consolidate their industries and eliminate any small business competition.

        Reply
        1. The Annoyed Elephant
          The Annoyed Elephant at |

          Challenge me on the statistics, and you’ll get the statistics.

          2,992 million people in the US make minimum wage or less. The largest group in that number are women, aged 16-24 years old, who make up 870,000 of those workers. 377,000 of those are teenagers. Overall, 1,443 million are under age 24. Overall, 1,549 million are 25 or older, but that’s from 25-120, meaning the most statistically dense group of people who make minimum wage are teenagers, followed by young adults just starting out. And in case you care about the numbers… that’s 48.2% of minimum wage workers who are indeed age 24 or younger who make up 8 years worth of minimum wage workers, versus the 25+ crowd who make up 40 years worth of minimum wage workers. Incidentally, this is the “just out of high school” argument that I just took out.

          Now let’s talk marital status. 1,969,000 of minimum wage workers have never been married. That would qualify them as “single”. Another 365,000 are divorced. That means that 2,334,000 (78%) would qualify as “not married”. Knock down the “single” argument.

          There are no available statistics on minimum wage workers with children in the home that I’ve been able to dig up, and while I would not doubt that a goodly number of them do have kids, the fact remains that your argument regarding the “vast majority” of minimum wage workers does not line up with facts.

          As for the role of “corporate America”… not even close. You know who makes up the majority of minimum and subminimum wage workers in the US? White, single, women working part-time waitressing jobs that pay subminimum wage and rely on tips to make up the difference. In fact, the joke is that this group (1,139 million) is almost equal to the entirety of people from both genders who make the full minimum wage (1,255 million). In fact, over 58% of the original 2.992 million are people who make tips and less than minimum wage (1,255 million). Those numbers, incidentally, do not include tips. And those “corporations”? Mostly small businesses, but also including places like Applebee’s and Hooters. Not exactly the image of “Corporate America” you’re trying to push there, dipstick.

          BTW: What’s wrong with profits? Profits make companies work and help them employ people. The computer you’re using to bitch about corporations was probably made by a bunch of corporations. So if you want to be true to your convictions, you should get rid of your computer and never use technology again. Otherwise, someone might want to point out that you’re acting like a gigantic hypocrite, and that might hurt your feelings.

          BTW: All these numbers come directly from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. I originally included a link, but you’re welcome to Google it yourself.

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