18 Responses

  1. Charles
    Charles at |

    You are wrong. John Astin rocks. He may not have been the Frank Gorshin Riddler; but, if we’d never seen it, it would’ve been pretty good…

    And, let’s see Gorshin do a one-man play on Edgar Allen Poe…

    Reply
    1. Supervisor194
      Supervisor194 at |

      I remember being conflicted as a kid seeing Astin take over the role. I loved both Gorshin and Astin for who they were. Gorshin was the man to me. Didn’t see Astin on Broadway, – would’ve loved to, and I’ve no doubt it was good, but did see Gorshin in a one man show about George Burns called “Say Goodnight Gracie”. It was pretty great in it’s own right.

      Reply
      1. John Smith
        John Smith at |

        My inlaws saw Frank Gorshin perform at a dinner theatre in Toronto. Not only was he the model of professionalism, but he was personable and welcoming to the audience.

        Reply
  2. dotmatrix
    dotmatrix at |

    GREATEST LIST EVER!

    Reply
    1. TopTenz Master
      TopTenz Master at |

      Ever? Well, maybe.

      Reply
  3. Ryan Thomas
    Ryan Thomas at |

    Apparently only Austrians can play Mr. Freeze…

    Reply
  4. John N
    John N at |

    Another that could make this list is Vincent Price as Egghead.

    Reply
    1. Orrin Konheim (article's author)
      Orrin Konheim (article's author) at |

      I thought Vincent Price was the perfect villain, but that’s just me.

      Reply
  5. brian
    brian at |

    really? the old batman wasn’t supposed to be good…at least that is what I’ve thought.

    Reply
    1. Orrin Konheim (article's author)
      Orrin Konheim (article's author) at |

      I mean, what can I say to that? I’m sure no one sets out to invest in a TV show that’s intentioanlly bad. It’s a show that just doesn’t adapt well to modern tastes or can neatly be placed in a box (is it humorous, is it action-packed, is it designed to teach a lesson, is it dramatic), but that’s what I found fascinating about it. Adam West likened Batman to Andy Warhol pop-art in his biography.

      Reply
  6. clement ng
    clement ng at |

    Of course the whole series was both ridiculous but that was what I prefer about this to the dark ominous somber take to batman later- that it took a crime-fighting series to comic. Archer, shame, Bookworm and dr. cassandra were fairly lame villains (like come on, a “fight” scene where the villains are invisible?!) but nora clavicle-barbara rush where batman-adam west is pied piper has to be the absolute worst along with marmaduke ffogg 3-part as a tie. there were some pretty bad joker-surf’s up, and penguin episodes which were pretty lame. A lot of times the first part of the episodes would be thrilling and the wrap-up episode would disappoint. Louie Lilac, Black Widow, and even catwoman. Zelda episodes were oddly the one adventure that did not disappoint. King Tut was another lame villain. False face was also entertaining. I actually didn’t mind the ma parker or the siren or mad hatter that much.
    Post comments as to best and worst episodes\adventures for each recurring villain. thnx

    Reply
    1. Orrin Konheim (article's author)
      Orrin Konheim (article's author) at |

      I liked Fogg. He was at least congruous with who he was supposed to be.
      I thought Bookworm was both spot-on for the poppy tongue-in-cheek nature of the show.
      I’d have to watch the Louie Lilac episode, it did sound pretty awful.

      Reply
  7. Jacob
    Jacob at |

    The whole series was awful. The only way it could possibly be entertaining is to etch when stoned. Come to think of it, it was made in the late 60s… that may explain a lot.

    I much prefer the Nolan movies. Batman: The Animated Series is famtastic, too. It was much more faithful to the comics (the comics have always had a darker tone. It is not something that came afer the 1960s series, which was a departure from the way Batman is supposed to be). The amimated series is one of the greatest animated superhero series of all time. Perhaps the greatest. If they ever did a live action series similar ro the animated series it could be a hit. It would surely be better than that silly 60s camp.

    Batman Beyond, another animated series, is very good, too. Bruce Wayne is cranky old eccentric living alone in ramshackle Wayne manor, having given up crimefighting due to a bad heart and some myaterious history. He ends up taking on a young protogé who becomes the new batman, working together with Wayne who does the investigative work from home. The new commissioner Gorden is Barbara Gorden, former batgirl who also quit vigilante justice for some myaterious reason, possibly involving whatever caused Wayne to quit. She is not to thri;led with the new kid at first. I wiah they’d make a movie based on it. Warner Brothers almost did but abandoned it, the fools.

    Reply
  8. jorge
    jorge at |

    @Jacob
    You are a fanboy with no taste and you cannot see beyond your nerd vision. 60’s Batman was the best.

    Reply
  9. dregj
    dregj at |

    arent they forgeting ceasar romero?

    Reply
  10. Scott
    Scott at |

    Once correction: Zsa Zsa Gabor and Elizabeth Taylor didn’t marry the same man. Zsa Zsa was married to hotel emperor Conrad Hilton and Elizabeth was married to his son, Conrad Hilton, Jr., nicknamed “Nicky”.

    Reply
    1. Orrin Konheim (article's author)
      Orrin Konheim (article's author) at |

      Sorry about that.

      Reply
  11. Bloodbuzz
    Bloodbuzz at |

    I have to disagree on the assessment of Van Johnson. His character was intended to be a musical genius using sound as a weapon to blackmail the Stock Exchange, and to be Batman’s techno-villain counterpart. He and Batman essentially conducted their own chess match over who’d outwit whom. As the Minstrel, his role was not as a fighter but a clever crooner and charmer with a sophisticated scheme. You overlooked many truly cockamamie villains in this overview, some of which were already named.

    Reply

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