12 Responses

  1. AmH at |

    Nice. The top 2 are a couple of my alltime favourite books. The Stranger also inspired the Cure song…”Killing An Arab”.

    Reply
    1. Sam Dot at |

      Thanks for reading! Yeah, The Stranger and The Plague are kind of my life… and Killing an Arab isn’t that great of a song but it’s still interesting trivia…

      Reply
  2. Terry Bigham at |

    Camus once said that James M. Cain’s first novel, the classic “The Postman Always Rings Twice” was a huge influence, stylistically and otherwise, for his “Stranger”.

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    1. Sam Dot at |

      Really? I haven’t read much on Camus on his influences except in an interview in Resistance, Rebellion, and Death where he mentioned how much he enjoyed the works of Herman Melville (who pioneered Absurdism). Where’d he say that he was influenced by “TPART”?

      Reply
    2. Caitlyn Park at |

      I would also be interested to know where Camus mentioned his inspiration for “The Stranger” by “The Postman Always Rings Twice”. I’ve found a few websites that mention that, but none that provide proof such as quotes or references.

      Reply
  3. Terry Bigham at |

    You might also consider Camus’ short novel “The Growing Stone”>

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    1. Sam Dot at |

      First of all “The Growing Stone” is a short story from Exile and the Kingdom. Secondly, I read it and didn’t really care for it much.

      Reply
    2. Sam Dot at |

      Also, thanks for reading!

      Reply
  4. ParusMajor at |

    James M. Cain also wrote “Double Indemnity” and “Mildred Pierce”. If you like his stuff, you should also read Horace McCoy’s “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?”

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  5. Moe at |

    Camus was also a journalist in Algeria and his articles are all full of this absurdism. But the most beautiful parts of these are the desscription he makes. He borders zola’s realism. No beautiful sentences, figure of style or any overzealous colour for lack of a better word. It is just plain reality that makes existentialism and absurdism all more poignant. If you can get your hands on these articles ( for la republique, edited in french i know), then you have a masterpiece of non fiction writing, everyday thoughts that forged camus’ style.
    Sorry if the spelling is not correct, Im french :)

    Reply
  6. Mayss at |

    The fall is by far and as Sartre pointed out, Camus’s most beautiful and least understood book. though i have not read the last man and it was only his first draft but i truly believe it was to be his masterpiece. I look forward to reading it

    Reply
  7. Paintslayer at |

    Thanks so much! This is exactly what i was looking for!

    Reply

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