4 Responses

  1. Simon at |

    Number 9 looks like a robot vacuum cleaner.

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  2. Bane at |

    i call “BS” on #10. Not because it’s not possible, but because of past history. Commercial airline makers like airbus and boeing have a long history of talking up what “COULD” be done with future planes, but when push comes to shove the airlines go for the far more boring and predictable features that make them more money. An on board fitness area on the A380, or a shopping arcade? nah, let’s cram as many cattle class seats as we can in the extra space and get a better profit margin! So yeah, a see thru plane would seem cool, but they’ll likely be more looking for a way to squeeze that last penny from each flight instead.

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  3. George Myers at |

    I read the Russians, where there is much water and marsh, were working in a really wide body, passengers sit across rather than in aisles, a lifting body propelled from the rear with side winglets, able to land on water without pontoons, carry like 10 or so into aquatic areas. I thought, seeing the patent, will see one online soon.

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  4. Marc at |

    If any one who reads this thinks for a minute that even one of these concepts will become reality, I have a bridge to sell you. The most laughable one is the statement “scheduled for completion in 2050″. No company in the history of the planet ever projected that far ahead, most have problems looking four years into the future. I’d love to see a rendering of an aircraft thought up in 1976 for delivery in 2013. I’m sure it would have been just as futuristic with transporter beams and robot flight attendants.

    If you want an example of what the industry projected and the actual reality, look no further than the development of the A380 eight years ago when Airbus predicted casino’s and cafes that passengers would stroll around to. Instead of all that, we got high density seating for 550.

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