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29 Responses

  1. John G.
    John G. at |

    Jimmy Stewart flew B-24 Liberators during WW2 and not B-17’s as you stated. Before entering combat, he was an instructor pilot on B-17’s in the United States. Read the book “Jimmy Stewart, Bomber Pilot”. Its a good reference.

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  2. yvonne dunn
    yvonne dunn at |

    I agree Audie murphy is the most decorated war hero ever and should be on the list at no1 for sure.

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  3. yvonne dunn
    yvonne dunn at |

    what is james stewart doing at no. 1 audie murphy should be no.1 He was so young when he inlisted and was only 19 years of age when the war ended. a real hero to the end.

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  4. Darron Stewart
    Darron Stewart at |

    Don’t forget about Sgt Bob Keeshan (aka Captain Kangaroo )who earned his navy cross the same day as Lee Marvin at Iwo Jima. Lee Marvin said Sgt Keeshan was one of the bravest men he ever saw standing on Red Beach urging his men forward to get them off of that beach amid machine gun and mortar rounds

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  5. Chris
    Chris at |

    Audie Murphy was a soldier before he was an actor. In fact it was because of his pile of decorations that he went into acting!

    He was a genuine badass nonetheless though.

    I remember in Basic Training, we were learning about our TA-50 (field gear) and our Drill Sergeant told us about Murphy and his exploits! He almost went to tears as spoke in reverence about the man. It was pretty moving!

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  6. M N Curlee
    M N Curlee at |

    David Niven also deserves mention. Although popularly known as a refined gentlemanly actor, during WWII Niven was actually a commando! His bio reads like an adventure story. And of course, like so many others of his era, when asked about his experiences in the war, he usually said something slightly self-depricating and changed the subject.

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    1. Lacey Sheridan
      Lacey Sheridan at |

      He fought for Great Britain, his native country.

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  7. Rob Bolvin
    Rob Bolvin at |

    Mr. D Griffin-My 1944 US Navy Bluejackets Manual, an official Navy publication given to all new recruits, has a photo of what it calls the Congressional Medal of Honor. The medal was commonly called this during WW2. While at the Pentagon you could have done your own research to find this out, as it seems to bother you so much.

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  8. Daryl Griffin former MAJ USA
    Daryl Griffin former MAJ USA at |

    I’m sick and tired of journalists and modern Hollywood types who are too lazy to do their homework because they look down on those who have and currently serve. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS THE CMOH!!!!!! IT IS NOT THE CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR NOR HAS IT EVER OFFICIALLY BEEN NAMED THAT!! IT IS THE: MEDAL OF HONOR awarded in the name of congress and presented by the President of the United States. Additionally the US doesn’t have a Silver Cross it is the Silver Star. I doubt Lee Marvin or Jimmy Stewart would appreciate your sloppy lazy research. I DO APPLAUD YOU FOR SHOWING TODAY’S GROUP OF LIBERTINE QUISLINGS IN HOLLYWOOD WHAT REAL MEN WHO WERE ACTORS DID WHEN HISTORY CALLED!!
    PS. Do you know which attack killed more Americans Pearl Harbor or 11 Sept. 2001? I was at the Pentagon so don’t whine to me about the war on terror. I APPLAUD YOU AGAIN FOR RECOGNIZING THESE HONORABLE MEN OF HOLLYWOOD.

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    1. Jack
      Jack at |

      Where in Lee Marvin’s or James Stewart’s bio do you see any reference to a “Silver Cross”? Perhaps they edited it after your post, but I don’t see it.

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      1. Hector Rivera Jr
        Hector Rivera Jr at |

        The author of this article listed a Silver Cross in Charles Dyrning’s biography.

        There is also a lot of controversy surrounding Durning’s WWII record (i.e. lies and exxagerations ) but he was awarded a Silver Star and Bronze Star; I don’t see why he had to lie claiming he landed on D-Day on Omaha Beach or that he survived the Malmedy Massacre or the Battle of the Bulge.

        http://m.web2carz.com/article/article.php?articleId=2097

        Reply
  9. Gawain
    Gawain at |

    It was surprising that Neville Brand didn’t make the cut. I’ve read that he was the fourth most decorated soldier in WWII. Then again I’ve also read that the Army didn’t track medals (but if that’s true why is it common knowledge that Audie Murphy was the most decorated soldier in WWII?).

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  10. Face
    Face at |

    Chuck Norris?

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    1. Wilm210
      Wilm210 at |

      While both his service and support of the United States Military is appreciated and honorable, Chuck Norris did not see combat like the rest of the men on this list. I know he was station in South Korea in 1958 but this was after the Korean War ended in 1953 (well not technically since only a ceasefire was declared but you get the idea).

      Reply
  11. Mike
    Mike at |

    The terrific actor Neville Brand played Texas Ranger Reese Bennett on the TV western Laredo(1965-’67)was also a highly decorated U.S.Army soldier who fought in Europe in WW II & who was wounded.

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    1. Jack
      Jack at |

      Absolutely!!! I was thinking Neville Brand would be no.2 and Audie no.1. I’m pretty sure Neville was the second most decorated soldier in WWII, although in interviews I saw he kind of dismissed and played down his bravery, just as all great heroes do. He even stated on a talk show it was another actor who was the second most (can’t remember who he said it was) that is also not on this list. Maybe they don’t consider him recognizable enough. Rod Steiger is also missing from this list. I saw a bio on TCM and he too should’ve been mentioned. James Garner saw action in Korea, as did Charles Bronson I believe.

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      1. larry leighton
        larry leighton at |

        No. Neville cleared that up before his death. He held several medals, but he wasn’t No. 2. He might have been No. 4, I can’t remember.

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  12. auto devis
    auto devis at |

    Mel Brooks is the one that is hard to believe. Wow he is such an amazing person.

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  13. LeoBassy
    LeoBassy at |

    And what do we have in Hollywood now? Pukes like Sean Penn & Alec Baldwin. Amazing how a generation can change things.

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  14. Wilm
    Wilm at |

    Wow, I never knew Mel was in the service, let alone he was at the battle of the bulge! cool list though I am ashamed to say I only know just 4 of the men on the list.

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    1. Wilm
      Wilm at |

      Oh one last thing, I figured Rod Serling (from Twilight Zone) would have made the list or at least an honorable mention, he saw combat in the pacific theatre at Leyte Gulf.

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      1. TriviaFan
        TriviaFan at |

        I think maybe because Rod Serling was more of a writer than an actor? Not that his service was not worthy of being mentioned. He did mostly intros to t.v. programs I think.

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  15. kyle
    kyle at |

    James Dohaan??

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    1. Jonathan Reiter
      Jonathan Reiter at |

      James Doohan was a Canadian who was in the Canadian Forces during the Second World War… He also had lost his middle finger…

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      1. tasmanian devil
        tasmanian devil at |

        Doohan was actually shot six times by one of his fellow Canadians with a nervous trigger finger.

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  16. David
    David at |

    What about Elvis?

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    1. Jonathan Reiter
      Jonathan Reiter at |

      He didn’t see combat… These guys did, although I shouldn’t include Clark Gable, he did too…
      Just for the record, I was in my country’s army, but didn’t go to a war… Good thing, too. I got more than enough problems to deal with right now…

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    2. larry leighton
      larry leighton at |

      Elvis wasn’t in WWII. However, Neville Brand, who isn’t in this list, WAS!

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  17. Clive
    Clive at |

    I’ve read stories about things Audie Murphy did during the war and I believe he is a great American hero but finding that he appeared in those movies adds a new perspective. Thankyou for making me realise that.

    Reply

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