The Story of the One Legged Man Who Out Smarted the Police

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Over in the UK in late 2011 the police were a little confused about how a guy they’d placed under police mandated curfew was repeatedly being arrested outside of the home they’d literally confined him to using modern technology. The hilariously named Christopher Lowcock had been charged for several serious charges, including possession of a weapon and a whole heap of drugs a few months earlier. Seeing as his crimes only made him a fairly moderate threat to the public, instead of putting him in jail they placed him under curfew and then slapped an electronic tag on his leg so they could make sure he didn’t leave his house full of electronic entertainment appliances, truly a punishment fitting of his crimes.

However, the police quickly noticed that Mr Lowcock (*Teehee) was leaving his house as and when he pleased without it setting off any of their alarms. When he was arrested again the police noticed that he wasn’t even wearing his electronic tag, he hadn’t taken it off. He’d just left it attached to his prosthetic leg.

jhh

Fun fact: The Wikipedia page on prosthesis literally has a picture of Owen Wilson squeezing someone’s robot arm on it.

Yes, Mr Lowcock’s name had been more telling than the police originally thought and he was the owner of one very fake leg, which the people they’d outsourced the electronic tagging to had failed to notice, because keeping tabs on violent criminals is obviously not a job for the police. Apparently Lowcock (We’ll never not find that funny) had wrapped his false leg in bandages and that was enough to fool the adequately trained professionals tasked with tagging him. To be fair though, nothing Lowcock did was dishonest, since we presume when he was asked by the people fitting his tag if his leg had been hurt in an accident, he wouldn’t be lying when he said he had. He just never pointed out that the accident happened years earlier.

Source. Source.

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