9 Responses

  1. Barry Brien at |

    What about Shakespeare?

    Reply
  2. The Riddler at |

    It’s a shame that his word is only as good as a history book. I like to think he wrote his own material. Even without standard forms of education, a genius has amazing potential. I suppose the law specific knowledge could’ve been acquired, though a definite explanation to this point eludes me. Nice list.

    Reply
  3. Don Adams at |

    William Shakespeare , by overwhelming popular acclamation , is the author of his works.

    The speculation is of no use , whatsoever.

    Accept it and move on.

    Reply
    1. The Riddler at |

      Touchy….it’s just a list.

      Reply
  4. Steve at |

    Of course Shakespeare wrote his own work. All of them. The man was a true polymath. Just because some scholars have found their niche by writing controversial theories that have no practical (or provable) basis in fact, doesn’t make those theories accurate. It just keeps the “scholars” relevant. And relevance, in academia, is the name of the game. Politics, baby!

    Reply
  5. redstick at |

    I think there’s a kind of “Jack the Ripper” snobbishness at work here: the Ripper HAD to be a celebratory. not some wretched, anonymous psycho low-life
    So it is that Shakespeare, a small-town boy with a perfectly good middle-class education could not possibly be, well, Shakespeare because he never went to college. True, enough, and a good thing, too — try reading some of the Highly Educated Writers of the period; the flatulent, high-flown pretentious bushwah will reduce all but the most insomniac reader to coma.

    Reply
  6. Justin Alexander at |

    This list should really just be William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, William Shakespeare, and (in a tie for first place) William Shakespeare and William Shakespeare.

    Reply
  7. Patrick Diego at |

    Some people need to be ‘in the know’ . They have a need to feel superior by virtue of their special knowledge or insight. Some are so enamored of status or royalty that they cannot imagine a common person with extraordinary talent. Marlowe faking his death is an exciting story. A Woman or a ‘secret’ royal personage is exciting as well. Personally, I find the historical William Shakespeare sufficiently supported by facts to be the author. But then, I have no problem with being a peasant, myself.

    Reply
  8. JOHN HUDSON at |

    The case for Amelia Lanier is set out in this article
    http://reformjudaismmag.org/Articles/index.cfm?id=1584

    Further information is at http://www.darkladyplayers.com

    Reply

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