20 Responses

  1. Peter Boucher at |

    Here is a good one. Ferdinand “Fred” Demara, (b. December 21, 1921 – d. June 7, 1982). He posed as a Benedictine Monk, A Priest, A Prison Warden, A Teacher, An Editor, A Cancer Researcher and a Military Surgeon. He wrote his autobiography and it soon became a movie entitled “The Great Imposter” starring Tony Curtis.

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  2. Peter Boucher at |

    I would like to add Ferdinand “Fred” Demara (b. December 21, 1921 d. June 7, 1982). Fred posed as an impersonator of a Benedictine Monk, A Priest, A Prison Warden, A Teacher, A Newspaper Editor, A Cancer Researcher and a Military Surgeon. He wrote his Autobiography which then became a movie entitled “The Great Imposter” starring Tony Curtis as Fred.

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  3. BryanJ at |

    Albert Ostman

    Albert Ostman was a Canadian prospector who was supposedly abducted by a Sasquatch and held captive for six days. The event took place near Toba Inlet, British Columbia in 1924. He did not tell the story until 1957.

    In 1924, Albert Ostman went on vacation to Toba Inlet near Powell River, British Columbia. He was searching for a lost gold mine located around the area. As Ostman lay asleep one evening a Sasquatch purportedly picked him up and carried him off while he was in his sleeping bag. Ostman was carried in his sleeping bag across country for 3 hours by the Sasquatch. The Sasquatch dropped Ostman down on a plateau. Standing around him was a family of 4 of the creatures.

    Albert was kept captive by the Sasquatch. The captors were 3 adults and a child which held Ostman captive for six days. One of the Bigfoots was reported as being 8 feet tall. Ostman did not use his gun on them as they had done him no harm. He stayed with the Bigfoot family for a week. Ostman ate “sweet tasting grass” that they gave him. According to Ostman the female Sasquatch washed and stacked leaves. Albert escaped by making the large male Sasquatch groggy by feeding him some snuff.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Ostman

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  4. BryanJ at |

    Seth Kinman (1815-1888)

    Seth Kinman was an early settler of Humboldt County, California. He was a master hunter and famous chair maker. He stood over 6 ft (1.83 m) tall and was known for his hunting prowess and his brutality toward bears and Indians. Kinman claimed to have shot a total of over 800 grizzly bears, and, in a single month, over 50 elk. He was also a hotel keeper, barkeeper, and a musician who performed for President Lincoln on a fiddle made from the skull of a mule.

    Known for his publicity seeking, Kinman appeared as a stereotypical mountain man dressed in buckskins on the U.S. east coast and selling cartes de visites of himself and his famous chairs. The chairs were made from elkhorns and grizzly bear skins and given to U.S. Presidents. Presidents so honored include James Buchanan, Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and Rutherford Hayes. Kinman may have had a special relationship with President Lincoln, appearing in at least two of Lincoln’s funeral corteges, and claiming to have witnessed Lincoln’s assassination.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seth_Kinman

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  5. Dennis at |

    One of the best lists-Extremely interesting and well done.

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  6. Bast at |

    Great list!

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  7. Meee at |

    Awesome list. I don’t know about the others, but they could have done more research for Leo Major, it seems he just read the badass of the week article. It is hard to find new information on him, but it only gets more insane as you dig things up. I believe that the at the time he lost his eye, he was fighting eight German SS soldiers. And he didn’t just play a large role in the liberation of Zwolle, he is THE liberator. When his friend Willie Arsenault was killed outside of Zwolle while Leo and him were on a recce mission, Leo pretty much went berserk. He strapped 3 machine guns to his back, grabbed a sack of grenades, and ran around ambushing patrols, setting fires, and creating explosions. He attacked the SS HQ and burned down the Gestapo HQ. Most sources say he captured 80-100 German soldiers throughout the night, but it is possible he could have captured around 150. He created so much noise that the Germans thought they were being attacked by a giant force, and they retreated from the city. Remember, Zwolle is a provincial capital city, with about 50,000 citizens and 1000 German soldiers occupying it at the time.
    And the hill he captured in Korea… it seems just as impressive to me as his liberation of Zwolle. 10,000 American soldiers had to retreat from the hill from 40,000 Chinese soldiers. They tried retaking the hill but failed. So they sent Leo, leading his team of 20 French-Canadians. When they recaptured the hill, they were counter-attacked by 14,000 Chinese soldiers for 3 days until reinforcements arrived. Major had been told to retreat but he refused and held his ground. He just died in 2008.
    Sorry for the rant lol, but Leo Major simply amazes me.

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  8. Peter Boucher at |

    I have had a very big interest upon the Kennedy Conspiracies since I was a teen. No.3, Aristotle Onassis is a very big surprise to me, but when it comes to the theories of JFK and RFK being assassinated, It really doesn’t surprise me. But offering Jackie O $3 million dollars to marry him ? I find that to be chauvinistic and very pigheaded, then again, Jackie O wasn’t the most approachable person as well and I am sure there may be some conspiracies about her as well.

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    1. Dennis at |

      I don’t know why she married Ari but it probablty was the power thing because three million dollars would have been walking around change for Jackie–Her father,Blackjack Bouvier, had more money than the Kennedys and her sister was married to royalty.

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  9. BryanJ at |

    J. D. Tippit (1924-1963)

    J. D. Tippit was a police officer with the Dallas Police Department who, according to two government investigations was shot and killed by Lee Harvey Oswald 45 minutes after he assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Oswald’s initial arrest was for Tippit’s murder, not Kennedy’s.

    15 minutes after JFK was assassinated, J.D. Tippit received a radio order to move into the central Oak Cliff area of Dallas. At approximately 1:11–1:14 p.m., Tippit pulled alongside Lee Harvey Oswald who was walking on East 10th Street in Oak Cliff.

    Oswald walked over to Tippit’s car and apparently exchanged words with him through the open vent window. Tippit opened the door and started to walk around the front of his car. As he reached the front wheel on the driver’s side, Oswald drew a .38 Special Smith & Wesson Victory revolver and fired four shots in rapid succession, hitting Tippit three times in the chest. He then walked up to Tippit’s fallen body and shot him directly in the head, fatally wounding him.

    Since the Warren Commission Report was published in 1964, some researchers have uncovered evidence and witness testimony that calls into question some of the Commission conclusions regarding Tippit’s murder. Some of this evidence indicates that Oswald may have had an accomplice in the killing, or that possibly Tippit was killed by an assailant other than Oswald.

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  10. BryanJ at |

    Park Young Seok (1963-2011)

    Park Young-Seok was a South Korean mountaineer. He is the first person in the world to complete the True Adventure Grand Slam. During his lifetime, Seok climbed the world’s 14 Eight-thousanders, the Seven Summits, and visited both poles. He holds the Guinness World Record for climbing six of the 8,000-meter Himalayan peaks within one year, and another record for reaching the South Pole on foot in 44 days, self-sufficient and without any food re-supplies.

    He climbed Everest, K2, Kangchenjunga, Lhotse, Makalu, Cho Oyu, Dhaulagiri, Manaslu, Nanga Parbat, Annapurna, Gasherbrum I, Broad Peak, Gasherbrum II, and Shishapangma.

    Park went missing on October 23, 2011 while attempting a new route on Annapurna. His team decided to abort the climb at around 6400 meters due to heavy rock fall and went missing during the descent. Despite a dangerous and daring rescue operation to find the climbers, no signs were found. The Korean Alpine Federation called off the rescue operation for Park and his team on October 28, 2011. He leaves behind a wife and two sons.

    Richard C. Weaver

    Richard C. Weaver is a Californian man known by the nickname “Handshake Man.” Weaver has earned notoriety for frequently bypassing the US Secret Service and shaking the hand of the United States President. Weaver claims to have shaken the hand of four US Presidents after Jimmy Carter. However, with little evidence of such events, it is unknown if these instances actually occurred.

    One event occurred at the 1997 inauguration of Bill Clinton where Weaver managed to shake Clinton’s hand. The incident led the Secret Service to prepare for his return in 2001. However, in 2001 Weaver was able to bypass security and meet the recently inaugurated George W. Bush. During the event, Weaver handed George W. bush a coin. The Capitol Police took the matter seriously as a breach of security.

    Weaver says the handshakes are used as a way of passing “notes from God” to the presidents. According to his site, Weaver is a born-again Christian who believes that God has directly spoken to him and calls himself a “modern day prophet.” On February 6, 2003 Weaver attended the National Prayer Breakfast meeting and was able to hand Bush an eight page typed letter about Iraq “from God.” In 2005, Weaver was arrested on an outstanding warrant related to this event. In late 2008, Weaver stated that he would not attempt to shake Barack Obama’s hand and has not yet done so.

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  11. BryanJ at |

    Aleksandr Karelin

    Aleksandr Karelin is a Hero of the Russian Federation. He was a dominant Greco-Roman wrestler for the Soviet Union and Russia. Karelin is generally considered the greatest Greco-Roman wrestler of all time. He was born as a 5.5 kg (12 lb) baby and went undefeated in international competition (spanning from 1987 to 2000). After going 13 years undefeated and six years without giving up a point, he lost to American Rulon Gardner in the gold-medal match at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.

    Karelin was revered for his extraordinary strength and is perhaps the strongest human to ever compete in athletic competition (pound for pound). He competed at the heaviest weight class of his day, 130 kg (286 lb). He was 6-feet-3 1/4 inches tall. Karelin’s conditioning and quickness combined with his dominance of the sport, led to him being known as “The Experiment.” When asked why he thought he was called that, Karelin noted that others don’t understand because “I train every day of my life as they have never trained a day in theirs.” When asked for a reply, the reported just shook his head.

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    1. Peter Boucher at |

      Aleksandr Karelin was one imposing figure and I did see the match on TV pitting him and American Rulon Gardner. Its really too bad what happened to Rulon when he endured his snowmobile “accident” in which some of his toes had to be amputated due to frost-bite. But you have written a very good synopsis of the man known as “The Experiment” Its mind blowing to think that he never lost in 13 years, but even more so never giving up a point in 6 years. Kudos to you, my friend.

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  12. BryanJ at |

    Phoenix Jones

    Phoenix Jones is the leader of a ten-member citizen crime-prevention patrol group who call themselves the Rain City Superhero Movement, operating out of Seattle and Lynnwood, Washington. In a CBS news broadcast, Jones was shown entering a back room of an unnamed comic book store in which he changed into a costume which consists of a Dragon Skin bulletproof vest and stab plating, as well as equipment including a stun baton, pepper spray or tear gas, handcuffs, and a first aid kit.

    Jones says that all members of the Rain City Superhero Movement have a military or mixed martial arts background. He does not condone other people dressing up and fighting crime. On Sunday, January 2, 2011, in Lynnwood, Phoenix Jones stopped and chased away a car thief as the car owner stood by in shock. On September 24, 2011, in the Belltown neighborhood of Seattle, Phoenix Jones doused a man with pepper spray after he attempted to steal a bus.

    In another incident, Phoenix Jones came to the defense of a potential fight victim. In their report, the police called it a case of “questionable use of pepper spray”, but the victim later told the Seattle Times that Jones was indeed a hero who had saved him from “a potential beat-down.” On November 27, 2011, near the Belltown neighborhood of Seattle, Phoenix Jones and crew followed a man accused of stabbing another man. They prevented the attacker from fleeing until the Seattle police arrived.

    On December 30, 2011, in the Belltown neighborhood of Seattle, Phoenix Jones and his crew provided police with valuable evidence on a New Years Eve shooting. When asked if he would have someone arrested for smoking marijuana, Jones said he considered it a low priority, and that he has no problem with people using drugs, but wants drug dealers to “sell somewhere else.” In reality, Phoenix Jones is a man named Ben Fodor. Benjamin Fodor holds an 11-0-0 record in unsanctioned amateur mixed martial arts fights and a 4-0-0 professional fight record.

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  13. BryanJ at |

    Candace Newmaker (1989-2000)

    Candace Newmaker was a victim of child abuse, killed during a 70-minute attachment therapy session. The treatment used during the session included a rebirthing script, in which Candace was suffocated to death. In April of 2000, Candace and Jeane Newmaker traveled to Evergreen, Colorado for a $7,000 two-week “intensive” session of Attachment Therapy with Connell Watkins.

    Following the script for that day’s treatment, Candace was wrapped in a flannel sheet to simulate a womb and told to extricate herself from it, with the apparent expectation that the experience would help her “attach” to her adoptive mother. While being told to free herself, four adults used their hands, feet, and large pillows to resist all her attempts to free herself. She complained, pleaded, and even screamed for help and air. In a recorded script of the events, Candace stated several times during the session that she was dying.

    Forty minutes into the session, Jeane asked Candace “Baby, do you want to be born?” Candace faintly responded “no,” this would be her last word. A year later, Watkins and Ponder were tried and convicted of reckless child abuse resulting in death and received 16-year prison sentences. Watkins was paroled in June, 2008, under “intense supervision” with restrictions on contact with children or counseling work, having served approximately 7 years of her 16-year sentence.

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    1. joey at |

      man, i just got really ticked off reading this

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  14. BryanJ at |

    Eugen Weidmann (1908-1939)
    Eugen Weidmann was the last person to be publicly executed in France. In 1937, he decided to murder and kidnap rich tourists visiting France to steal their money. The murder trial of Weidmann, Million, Blanc and Tricot in Versailles in March 1939 was the biggest since that of Henri Désiré Landru, the modern-day “Bluebeard”, 18 years earlier. On June 17, 1939, Weidmann was beheaded outside the prison Saint-Pierre in Versailles.

    The “hysterical behavior” by spectators was so scandalous that French president Albert Lebrun immediately banned all future public executions. Unknown to authorities, film of the execution was shot from a private apartment adjacent to the prison. British actor Christopher Lee, who was 17 at the time, witnessed this event. Executions by guillotine in France continued in private until September 10, 1977, when Hamida Djandoubi was the last person to be executed.

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  15. Brittney Ray at |

    Here’s a good one. Carl Tanzler (1877-1952) was a German-born radiologist at the United States Marine Hospital in Key West, Florida who developed a morbid obsession for a young Cuban-American tuberculosis patient, Elena Milagro “Helen” de Hoyos (July 31, 1909 – October 25, 1931), that carried on well after the disease had caused her death. In 1933, almost two years after her death, Tanzler removed Hoyos’s body from its tomb, and lived with the corpse at his home for seven years until its discovery by Hoyos’s relatives and authorities in 1940.

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  16. Dennis at |

    Great list. Leo Major was the most fascinating to me.

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  17. Dennis at |

    Just how many “Great Imposters” have there been? About every 20 years we hear about another one. The one Tony Curtis played in the early 60′s was said to actually have existed.

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