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  1. Matt at |

    Hemingways time as an ambulance driver and subsequent injury was chronicled in two film adaptations of "A Farewell To Arms" over the years, a miniseries, and the 1996 film "In Love and War," also based on that time. Also, the film "The Sun Also Rises" chronicles part of his early years in Paris and his fascination with bullfighting. Though based on novels, these are heavily biographical, with the main character in "In Love and War" playing Hemingway, not one of his characters.

    Your entire entry on him is ill-informed and misleading to the reader.

    Reply
    1. Evan at |

      Matt,

      I realize that there have been movies made of some of Hemingway’s books, and it’s true that they are all very autobiographical. But none of them really claim to tell his story (other than In Love and War, which isn’t very good), or present the real characters in his life. A Moveable Feast, on the other hand, is a memoir, and it still hasn’t been made into a movie. That’s the story I was saying should be told, the rest was just background info. Sorry if it was a bit confusing.

      Reply
      1. John McDonnell at |

        I agree. The movie that should be made is "A Moveable Feast". Nobody has really done a movie about Hemingway's life in Paris in the 20s, and it would make a great film. For one thing, there was a cast of great characters — Joyce, Pound, Eliot, Stein, and many others. You'd have the visuals of Paris, which is a great city to film. I'd like some scenes of Hem's early life, because his childhood formed him in so many ways. His later life was also interesting, but less so, because he turned into a rather bloated celebrity who was past his prime for many years.

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        1. Joe Man at |

          Midnight in Paris…Woody Allen?

          Reply
  2. Lou at |

    One story I think would be good for an HBO Series would be a History of the Peloponeissian (sp?) War. The success of Rome and the movie "300" is proof that people are still fascinated with stories of the ancient world.

    Reply
  3. Ben at |

    A movie about the Dyatlov Pass incident could be really scary and creepy if it was done like the "Blair Witch". If the writers and directors never actually show what caused the deaths, but none the less shows the deaths then it will be good. If they start showing aliens kidnapping them then this movie will be terrible.

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    1. Dustin at |

      It would also make a nice back drop for an hour long tv show. Think X-files with Mulder and Scully trying to get to to the bottom of a similar occurrence and Mulder referencing Dyatlov Pass.

      Reply
  4. Dude, at |

    The part about the bodies found having levels of radiation contamination is total bull.

    http://www.cracked.com/article_16671_6-famous-uns

    Reply
    1. Evan at |

      Yeah, I've read that article since writing this. Very interesting stuff. I still don't think they explain away all of the weird details of the story, but it certainly clears up a lot of the rumors.

      Reply
  5. Matthew at |

    One story I'm a little surprised that wasn't on the list is about Bedford, Virginia. Bedford suffered more D-Day casualties per capita than any other US city. Done right, the story could be heartwrenching and uplifting. Show what family on the homefront are doing interspersed with memories of the soldiers when they were home and showing them away in Europe, leading up to the Normandy invasion. Once the invasion happens, show the trickle of telegrams coming in as it becomes a flood, the reactions of families and of those who survived the invasion.

    The Richmond Times Dispatch had a great article on the story of Bedford several years ago around June 6 (I'm thinking 2004, not 100% sure on that tho). The story had me near tears and the thought that it would make a great movie stayed in my mind.

    Reply
  6. Bryan at |

    Great article,

    I just watched a television documentary on Nikola Tesla that was very interesting. He was pretty amazing.

    Reply
  7. Jennifer at |

    Wow you really get into history for your movies.

    Reply
  8. Gisli Steinn at |

    Always wanted to see a movie about Tesla, but it has to be played by Sharlto Copley

    pic – http://i29.tinypic.com/2wlwrcg.png

    Reply
  9. ironflange at |

    There have been several movies made about Rommel.

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    1. Evan at |

      Yeah, including Rommel's story is a bit of a cheat, but there hasn't been a version for a while, and I think it's an interesting enough story that it deserves to be told again.

      Reply
  10. Richard at |

    There is no such thing as a "huge amount of artists". If you're going to write, you should learn the King's English.

    Reply
    1. TopTenz Master at |

      I would consider it a figure of speech. I'm sorry that is all you took from this top 10 list.

      Reply
  11. YogiBarrister at |

    A fantastic movie could be made about the Edward De Vere, the Earl of Oxford. Aside from writing the plays and sonnets of Shakespeare he had an icredible life. A few highlights: He lost his father when he was young, his step-father stole much of his legacy. He grew up in a house with an enormous library. As a teenager he helped his uncle translate OVID into English, the same uncle who adapted an Italian form of poetry into what became known as sonnets. Wrote numerous sonnets and poems that mimic Shakespeare's. He was acquitted of murdering a servant with a sword in what he claimed was an accident. He was kidnapped by pirates and almost forced to walk the plank, instead he was ransomed. There is a famous tapestry depicting four noblemen holding a canopy over Queen Elizabeth, after England detroyed the Spanish armada. He is one of those men. He studied law. He wrote plays, funded and founded theater groups. He traveled extensively throughout Italy and visited or lived in the cities used as backdrops for Merchant of Venice, Taming of the Shrew, and Romeo and Juliet. He was a friend of Sir Francis Bacon who famously, but cryptically accredited the works of Shakespeare to De Vere.

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  12. YogiBarrister at |

    Bryan stole my thunder. Tesla is a better subject for a documentary than a movie, although he was a terrific charadter in something called the prestige.

    Reply
  13. reid at |

    I seem to remember a movie about Gaugin's time in Tahiti, with Keifer Sutherland in the role of Gaugin. Wasn't particularly good or well known, but there was a movie…

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    1. Evan at |

      You're right. I just looked it up and there is a movie called Paradise Found from 2003 with Kiefer Sutherland as Paul Gauguin. I hadn't heard of it before writing the list, but I guess I ought to check it out.

      Reply
  14. Paul the cab driver at |

    Top ten movie ideas is a fabulous article but Hollywood will never touch any of these stories. They are far more interested in making idiotic crap with Will Ferrell and Adam Sandler. "Hollywood" wouldn't know a good plot if it fell from the sky and killed Sandra Bullock (which, come to think of it, is the start of a very good movie plot).. The last 17 movies I have seen have sucked big time. And frankly I am sick of it. The problem, as I see it, is the current big budget film distribution system that limits the number of films produced each year, and who gets to produce them. I think a better venue for these film ideas is "Bollywood". The Indians have a huge up and coming film industry open to new ideas and films, and not quite as hog tied as the American film industry.

    Reply
  15. Bo D at |

    I like this topic. One that I always thought would be good was the Frankie Filchock cheating scandal in the 1930's NFL. There were starlets, gangsters, and old time football players involved. Then he had to play in the championship game under a cloud of suspicion.

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  16. peter aardvark at |

    My suggestion is the story of James Jewitt. (WHITE SLAVE OF THE NOOTKA) He was young English blacksmith and in the early 1800's he joined a trading ship that explored the Northwest Pacific coast (on what is now the west coast of Vancouver Island in Nootka Sound) . The ship happened to be unlucky in that it arrived after a previous trading ship had some conflict with the local natives (I believe that the natives had stolen some items and the Captain had fired on the village) So when Jewitts ship arrived the local Chief Maquinna had befriended the Captain and received a flintlock musket. It either broke or was faulty and Maquinna returned and wanted it repaired. The Captain gave the gun to Jewitt to repair and made some disparaging remarks about the Chief, which Maquinna overheard.

    With resentment over the previous ship and his insult by the ships Captain Maquinna plotted his revenge, and when half the crew was lured away for a fishing trip with the natives Maquinna and his men stormed the ship and killed everyone on board except for Jewitt who was below the deck and another man. As Jewitt came up on deck he found the decapitated heads of the Captain and the rest of the crew. Maquinna kept Jewitt as a slave as he knew that he would be useful as a blacksmith and Jewitt convinced him to save the other crewmember by telling Maquinna that the man was his father.

    Jewitt was with the Nootka for several years and kept a journal and made ink from blackberry juice

    he developed a respect and some friendship with Maquinna and eventually was able to escape by passing notes to a visiting ship. He later wrote a book and even travelled the country doing a one man play about being the White Slave of the Nootka.

    (Anthropologists have found his account useful, and there has been talk of making a movie but nothing yet).

    Cheers

    Peter.

    Reply
  17. Jijo at |

    The film about the Stockholm syndrome has already been made…

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0323434/

    Norrmalmstorg is the swedish title and it was made in 2003.

    Reply
  18. ekg at |

    i normally don’t see eye to eye with these type posts, but i agree with eight of these, particularly #’s 9 and 10! i had just learned about dyatlov pass a couple months ago and boy, what an eerie mystery!

    Reply
  19. Ryan at |

    I’ve always thought the story of Charles XII of Sweden would make an incredible film. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_XII_of_Sweden

    Reply
  20. garetz at |

    Telsa is one of the greatest people in history, he has done more than anyone to progress science and is the father of our modern technology, yet he is barely reported on or revered like edison and einstein.

    I wonder why.

    Reply
  21. Jesse Blanco at |

    I am the producer of the upcoming film on the Niihau incident.
    Currently titled “East Wind, Rain” based on the novel by Caroline Paul.
    Masato Harada is set to direct with a real Japanese and Hawaiian cast.

    Reply
  22. Peter Boucher at |

    Regarding No.4 and Paul Gauguin, I believe that he was portrayed in the movie “Lust For Life” (about Van Gogh starring Kirk Douglas) and Gauguin was portrayed by Anthony Quinn. But I am amazed that a movie about Johann Sebastian Bach has never been made. We have “Amadeus” (Mozart), “Immortal Beloved” (Beethoven), “A Song To Remember” (Chopin), “Wagner” ( Wagner), “Song Of Norway” (Grieg), etc.

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  23. Peter Boucher at |

    We know about and have seen biographies on many great composers throughout history : “Amadeus”, (Mozart), “Immortal Beloved” (Beethoven), “A Song To Remember” (Chopin), “Wagner” (Wagner). “Lisztomania” (Liszt), “Song Of Norway” (Grieg), “Song Of Love” (Robert and Clara Schumann with Katherine Hepburn as Clara)……So my point is, why has there been NOT a movie about the life of the greatest composer whoever lived, that being Johann Sebastian Bach. I asked a professional classical musician one time about why a movie has not been made about him, and he answered that Bach’s life really had no anecdotes. Anecdotes ? For God’s sake, he had 21 children and was constantly composing music, so I imagine that he was busy. But before I die, I would love to see a depiction of his life in the form of a movie.

    Reply
    1. Kathy at |

      Greatest composer ever? Bach? Pfffft.

      Rachmaninov.

      Reply
  24. Peter Boucher at |

    How about a movie about the life of the greatest composer whoever lived…..Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

    Reply
  25. Lachlan at |

    How about a film based on the true story of a professional football (soccer) team which, while at the pinnacle of their success, volunteered en masse to fight in World War 1 ?

    The team was Scottish club Heart of Midlothian FC, one of Edinburgh’s two top-flight professional teams (the other being Hibernian). Hearts were top of the league in season 1914-15, winning 8 games in a row. The continuation of professional football was becoming increasingly controversial after the war started and progressed and was raied more and more in the Westminster parliament. After the BEF suffered huge losses at Ypres in November 1914, Britain became even more determined for fit men to step forward. Meanwhile, professional footballers hid behind their contracts to avoid the pressure to volunteer.

    So, at the start of December, a charismatic self-made man and member of parliament, 54 year-old George McCrae MP, decided to raise a battalion entirely of Edinburgh men. The Lord Provost was raising a similar battalion in Edinburgh. McCrae, in the uniform of the Royal Scots, paraded along Princes Street ahead of a pipe band and called for recruits to a rally in the Usher Hall. Within 3 days, he had enough for two battalions of his own. Among those who volunteered were the first and second teams of Heart of Midlothian, plus many fans who’d not yet joined. They formed C Company. The battalion became 16th Battalion Royal Scots (2nd Edinburgh), also known as McCrae’s battalion. Other Scottish teams, including rivals Hibernian, came forward with players and fans too, but not in the same numbers as Hearts.

    The news of this mass volunteering by Hearts reached Westminster, where Winston Churchill publically praised their action and called for other professional clubs to do the same.

    McCrae’s went to France in January 1916 as part of 34th Division, led by McCrae himself. They first saw action in what would become the British Army’s blackest day, 1st July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The British suffered nearly 60,000 casualties – 30,000 of that within the first hour. The deaths were over 19,000. The 34th Division suffered the highest casualties. 3 Hearts players were killed that day and McCrae was seriously wounded and invalided back home. By 1918, Hearts FC had lost 7 players killed and many of the rest of the team were maimed or gassed and unable to play professional football again.

    The camaraderie of sport in war.

    Reply
  26. Tony Doerr at |

    There is a movie on Tesla. It is rather old but very interesting. http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/nikola-tesla-the-genius/

    Reply
  27. Alarm Vibrating Watch at |

    Yes,Ok, these are the attractive movies for all kind of people in society.
    Alarm Vibrating Watch

    Reply
  28. PG at |

    The movie “Devil’s Pass” is based on the Daytlov Incident. Good watch!

    Reply

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