30 Responses

  1. Mary at |

    You forgot the Mother-in-Law's Tounge

    Reply
  2. Ken at |

    "Lucky Bamboo", while technically a grass, is the easiest plant I've ever had to take care of. If placed in a glass container filled with pebbles or beads, simply watch the water level of the jar/vase/glass it's in. As long as the glass is fairly full of water – you're good! Also, as the plant grows (quickly) you can cut it in half, and you have 2 plants!

    I bought a pair of them 3 years ago, and now I have over 12 of them all around the house. They get leafy too – you can also cut off the leaves if they have a bit of stalk, and BAM! Another plant! Lucky Bamboo is also unique in that you keep it in shady areas of your house with only ambient light. It's also a very cheap plant, so there is no need to worry if you do kill one, another one is just a couple dollars away!

    Reply
    1. Larry at |

      Sorry, Ken – “Lucky Bamboo”, while technically a grass" is wrong. Lucky Bamboo is not a grass or a bamboo. It is Dracaena sanderiana, also known as Ribbon Dracaena. All Dracaenas are in the Liliacea family. This is important in that it offers clues to its care. Lucky Bamboos should be cared for like the tender tropical shrubs they are not like cold hardy sun-loving grasses & bamboos.

      Reply
    2. Binki at |

      Thanks! I saw some bamboo plants at Wal-mart. I am going to buy some today.

      Reply
  3. Alex at |

    You forgot Aspidistra – Cast Iron Plant. Will stay alive with almost no light and once a month waterings.

    Reply
  4. Liz at |

    The peace lily and English ivy are also excellent for improving air quality in the home.

    Mother-in-law's tongue or snake plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) is also very hardy, as Mary mentioned. I've heard it called the 'behind the door' plant because it could withstand that much neglect. It is also a very good filter of indoor air pollution.

    Rubber plants fit both of these categories as well (easy to care for, good air filter).

    Reply
  5. TopTenz Master at |

    I agree with lucky bamboo. I have neglected this plant for weeks and it comes back every time I add water. I actually feel guilty over my poor nurturing habits towards it. Yet it always rewards my pitiful attempts to revive it with more growth. It is a worthy contender for the Hard to Kill House plant hall of fame.

    Reply
  6. carolyne at |

    hmmmm… of this top 10 list, i've had 4 of these plants. i almost killed my jade plant and had to give it back to my mom to nurse it back to health lol. i killed an ivy, a few african violets, and my winter cactus. not on the list , but i've been told it's also a plant that's hard to kill but i've managed to kil one anyway, is an aloe plant. i've also just recently killed my bamboo.

    my mom keeps offering to buy me fake plants.

    Reply
  7. Viktoria Slutsky - V at |

    African Violet – Saintpaulia – this plant wasn't hard to kill at all:-)

    Reply
  8. Ck at |

    I have to agree with Carolyne. My jade plant isn't doing so well and I already killed my lucky bamboo =(. I keep joking with my husband that I'm going to pull out all the plants in our yard and plant fake ones because we're so awful with keeping them alive.

    Reply
  9. acosinus at |

    The one most important species you forgot are the retired people in Croatia.

    No food, water or warming for weeks, and still manage to survive somehow.

    Reply
  10. Martin at |

    The Ficus we have definitely is a survivor, it gets just ambient house light and has grown to the ceiling. It got so many little bugs tho eating on it I had to cut it back to the truck just leaving 3 branches with about 5 very little leaves on each. Me and my girlfriend laughed about it thinking I killed it. It now has grown back looking as good as ever with hardy any light . Sorry do not know what type of Ficus it is, it is not a fig which is also ficus. It is the kind you see in office building. Let me know if someone thinks they know what type it mite be.

    Reply
  11. Rosie at |

    I think that Croton is so easy to kill – one little draught and all the leaves fall off.

    Reply
  12. Christopher Ronalds at |

    You forgot Cannabis.

    Reply
  13. Move out cleaning at |

    We all know that not everyone is born with the magical green thumb. Some people seem to just have the touch and ideas to keep a garden looking beautiful throughout all of the seasons, or maybe they just know how to take good care of indoor house plants. On the other hand, we also know those who seem to be able to just look at a plant and kill it. That's right; those people with the dreaded green thumb who could probably kill a vase of plastic flowers.

    Reply
  14. anon at |

    I have this plant and didn’t know what it was. Have managed to keep it alive for about 5 years so I guess it IS pretty tough to kill

    Reply
  15. matt at |

    i’ve killed multiple jade plants… and african violets are one of the hardest plants to keep (hint: you can’t get anything but the roots wet or they rot away).

    Reply
  16. anon at |

    I think I’ve had all of these – and managed to kill every one of them.

    Reply
  17. alanson at |

    you forgot the air fern which my mom killed btw

    Reply
  18. Spring cleaning services at |

    I think I’ve had all of these – and managed to kill every one of them.

    Reply
  19. Bad Habit at |

    African Violets should NOT be number one on this list. They are actually fairly picky plants, and need relatively attentive caretakers to truely thrive. As well, they come in countless colours, and not only bi-coloured but tri-coloured as well. I currently have 12 varities of African Violet, and numerous cuttings. This plant NEEDS to be watered from the bottom, otherwise the leaf will burn and die.

    I would have liked to see the umbrella plant on this list, as well as the Madagascar Palm. Both plants are relatively easy to care for.

    I have to praise the Yucca, Jade and Dracaena – all plants that have survived long periods of neglect from myself or family members.

    Reply
  20. Ali at |

    For the Peace Lily in the first sentence, you have spelled “ahrd” wrong.

    Reply
  21. Sara at |

    I really need some advice I have peace lily which I bought 2months back &its full with healthy green leaves now it has some baby leaves but the leaves getting brown not yellow and not flower since I bought the plant. My Gardner came every week and give them water.

    Same thing goes to my others plant their leaves brown like burn &yellow on tip.

    Any help would be great

    Reply
    1. lee at |

      might check ph level in soil and over use of fertilizers would do it, also mold and how much or little humidity. also over watering. I guess really i am an enemy because I apply herbicides for a company I work for, but have some knowledge of plant physiology. lol hope this might give you ideas!!

      Reply
  22. E at |

    I love this page, thank you to this site & all the comments for these beautiful plants / ideas;)

    Reply
  23. Zaza at |

    hi
    I have had peace lilies for more than 2 years now. It was given to me in memory of a housemate who passed away. It is easy to care for and i have divided the plant into 2, and now i have 2 pots. Its good to know that these plants act as air filter to the home. I love green leaves but love flowering kinds too. I now want to try a bonsai since it doesnt take a lot of watering or fertilising, right??

    Reply
  24. lee at |

    please everyone if you plan to plant outside. just remember that if you are importing plants or seed from diffferent states or countries it could become an invasive species and wreck havoc on natural plants. make sure to do some history on the plant. i.e. johnson grass, kudzu, thistle….

    Reply
  25. lee at |

    excellent site and was was wondering what to plant in a section of my house that doesn’t get alot of sunlite. keep up the good work!!

    Reply
  26. Skyla Thomas at |

    Yucca is impossible to kill I have over watered this thing forgotten bout it for 6 months to dry up left it in the dark for days left it in a scalding window it’s beautiful kind of looks like a palm tree but short bright green and re potted it bout 4 months ago it was so top heavy it kept falling over and I don’t have a clue how to repot plants and its still great o and the baby and dog have chewed on it and they are fine :) I love this thing gonna get more

    Reply
  27. Gayle at |

    I received a philodendron clipping from my husband’s secretary when I met him in 1972. The plant is still growing strong despite some periods of horrendous neglect, i.e. no watering for months at a time. And my peace lilies have been thriving for more than 20 years. I have never had any success with either jade or african violets. I would like to add so color so I might try the chinese cactus.

    Reply

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