105 Responses

  1. stuthedude at |

    Good, well researched list. One correction that I am aware of is the reference to the first use of concentration camps by the Ottomans shortly before WW1. I don’t know if it was the first but concentration camps were used by the British against the Afrikaaners during the Anglo Boer War (1901).

    Reply
    1. IrishSteve at |

      Whilst not defending them, they weren’t concentration camps in the sense we think of them today. They were an effort to cut the boars supply lines by removing the farmers and farm that the guerrillas relied on. The fact many died in them was less to do with an attempt at ethnic cleansing and more to do with military incompetence. The British held an inquiry called the Fawcett Commission that criticized the conditions in the camps and lead to improvements that at least cut the death rates. The camps also became public knowledge in the UK causing a widespread revulsion.

      Reply
    2. i2Shock4SwordB8 at |

      Well researched my a$$, Jeff Danelek is extremely uneducated in a topic he knows absolutely nothing about. I suggest you actually doing your homework, with scholarly research, before speaking on topics that you are obviously biased about Mr Danelek. Until I would never consider any of your compositions to hold ANY MERIT WHAT SO EVER on any topics, especially not this one.

      I’ve done my homework & will enlighten you to the truth should you chose to desire to educate yourself on a topic that your ignorance is implied throughout the entire composition. Do enjoy!

      Works Cited
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      http://www.umb.edu/news/1997news/reporter/ureporter1097/columbusday.html.
      Belasco, Susan et al., The Bedford Anthology of American Literature, Volume
      One: Beginnings to 1865. Pgs. 14-15. Aug. 2007. Print.
      â??Christopher Columbusâ?? The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 4. New York: Robert
      Appleton Company, 1908. 3 Jul. 2012.
      Danelek, Jeff. Top Ten Most Horrific Genocides In History
      http://www.toptenz.net/top-10-most-horrific-genocides-in-history.php
      De Las Casas, Bartolome. A Brief Account of the Destruction of the Indies.1689.
      Afterword Hewson, R. London. pgs. 3-39. 2007. Print.
      Dunn, Oliver, et al., â??The Diario of Christopher Columbusâ?? First Voyage to
      America, 1492-1493. Dunn. Oklahoma Press. 1989. N.p. 2012. Web.
      Declaration of Independence. 4 July, 1776. U.S. National Archives. 2012. Web.
      â??Eugenics.â?? The Free Dictionary of Fairfax. Np. Nd. Web
      Fuson, Robert H. â??The Log of Christopher Columbus.â?? Camden, Maine:
      International Marine Publishing. p. 51-94. 1992. Print.
      â??Genocide.â?? The Free Legal Dictionary of Fairfax. Np. Nd. Web.
      Genocide of Native Americans:
      http://www.operationmorningstar.org/genocide_of_native_americans.htm
      Johansen, Bruce E., Sterilization of Native American Women. José Barreiro
      (editor-in-chief of NATIVE AMERICAS) September, 1998.
      Lemkin, Raphael. 1944. Axis Rule in Occupied Europe: Laws of Occupation
      Analysis of Government Proposals for Redress. Washington, D.C.: Carnegie
      Endowment for International Peace. Nov. 2003. Web.
      Marino, Gregory â??Columbusâ??s Genocideâ?? http://ux.brookdalecc.edu/fac/history/
      Tangents/ARTICLESFORTANGENTS/Columbus’s%20Genocide.htm
      Native American Cultures. History.com. n.p., n.d. 2012. Web
      Newcomb, Steve. â??Five Hundred Years of Injustice.â?? Shamanâ??s Drum. Fall 1992,
      p. 18-20.
      Paul, Daniel N., â??Christopher Columbus 1451-1506: Opens the Door to European
      Invasion of the Americas.â?? American Indian Histor-Miâ??Kmaq First Nation: We
      Were Not the Savages. Daniel Paul, n.d. Web. 2 Jul. 20.
      Perdue, Theda. â??The Legacy of Indian Removal.â?? The Journal of Southern
      History 78.1
      Rhawn Joseph, Ph.D., Evolution of Paleolithic Cosmology and Spiritual
      Consciousness, and the Temporal and Frontal Lobes. Journal of Cosmology,
      2011, Vol. 14. Jul. 2012. Web.
      Sanderlin, George. Bartholomew De Las Casas. New York: Random House,
      1971.
      Verdesio, Gustavo. A Companion to Latin American Literature and Culture.
      Mapping the Pre-Columbian Americas: Indigenous Peoples of the Americas
      and Western Knowledge. Ed. Sara Castro-Klaren. Malden, MA: Blackwell
      Publishing Ltd., 2008. p. 33-48. Print.
      Yewell, John, ed. Confronting Columbus. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland,
      1992.

      Reply
      1. Chris at |

        Thank you i2Schock… EXACTLY, ACCURATE MY ASS! Within the first few lines blatant errors. Small pox WAS intentionally given to Native Americans as Gifts of blankets which were purposely infected with the virus… Learn your history!! Shameful mistakes

        Reply
      2. jayo at |

        ah, come on, what did you expect from an author whose main field of writing is esoterics…

        Reply
  2. Clive at |

    Very informative list. I’ve always researched wars and battles and I’ll admit I have learned a lot from this. Greatly researched and layed out.

    Reply
  3. This List Is Uninformed at |

    China currently have the biggest population, and it was during Mao’s era that a massive population boom occured in China.

    Logic dictates that only stupid brainwashed westerners can believe that Mao attempted a massacar. When clrarly, in Mao’s era, the population of China increased dramatically, as well as the average life expectancy, and the educated populace.

    Reply
    1. Martin Fierro at |

      Clearly you like Mao. However, he list is still true

      Reply
      1. The List Is Uninformed at |

        All Chinese people… well, most, understands that it was because of Mao, China manage to do quite good, although there are negative sides (such as taking money from the rich), the positive sides outweighs the negatives.

        For example, my grandfather (on my mother’s side) was tricked off a contract and his land was taken, only to be distributed, however, there was no “killing” and he was not “thrown into pirson”. Thus, when the economy is back up and wealth are being generated, the percentage of lower class is dramatically decreased. Obviously, if you attempt to overthrow him and start another rebellion when Mao have so many supporters and China is already recognised as the sick man of Asia, that is extensively stupid.

        Now if “45 million – 70 million” are killed, how exactly do you think China managed to obtain the largest population in the entire world? Which is four times larger than the population of USA, where no massacars have ever take place, supposedly, a very wealthy country with a very high average life expectancy, adding to the fact that there was a huge wave of immigrations in the 1900’s.

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        1. F at |

          Good point. Couldn’t agree more.
          At junior high, my history book tell lots of bad thing about dictator mao. But in geography subject, statical data and graphs shows the increased wealth and life expectacy are a lot better than most of asian country. And everytime I see mao on documentary film, it seems like his people loves him very much.

          Reply
          1. Stop already... at |

            … are you people above (not Martin Fierro) dense, or just completely indoctrinated? Please, get a clue.

            Reply
            1. Oh my god at |

              Have you ever actually spoken to a Chinese person about this?

              When they say that 45-70 million people died, they’re not just using the general census. These are town records kept away from the public eye. These are reports from people actually living in specific communes. Many people lost their lives and it was reported in documents and records that many people were ‘punished’ with their lives for stealing just a simple potato or a handful of grain.

              Not only that, many people lost all of their life savings and ended up with nothing. My grandparents lost their entire fortune because of Mao’s policies. Many of my friends have had relatives who’ve lost their lives because of the torture in the hands of red guards, or they’ve committed suicide because it was too much to handle.

              If you go and ask a Chinese person right now, what they think of the policies placed in the Great Leap Forward or the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, they’d tell you how messed up it was. My grand aunt literally said that “everyone there was crazy, and even if you weren’t, you’d have to pretend to be or they’d accuse you of being a traitor or having ‘black’ blood.”

              The people loved him because he projected himself as a god. His cult of personality was so great that if people didn’t own a ‘red book’ of his quotes, they could be killed on the spot.

              So yes, for a while, maybe some of them were richer because they had their own land, but if you ask around, most people would say their condition of life turned for the worse.

              and let me remind you that many of these ‘statistics’ given out by China were falsified. It was common for people to exaggerate what they had. For example, in the Great Leap Forward, each commune was supposed to make a specific quota of goods, but many could not meet it, and they still had to make it seem as if the idea was working or they’d be killed. If you didn’t make it seem as if Mao’s idea was working, there was a probability that you would be persecuted.

              Just keep that in mind.

  4. Andrzej Kozanko at |

    You must be kidding with number 8! You call the withdrawal of invader an “Expulsion of Ethnic Germans”? What about holocaust? 6 million people were murdered by these poor ethnic Germans. What kind of journalism is it?!!

    Reply
    1. seaScorpius at |

      Actualy, most of the ethnic Germans were NOT involved and any that were, were arrested (if men) or their heads shaved (if women) and I hardly believe that ethnic German children should be blamed for this. It was the German/Nazi army that was to blame and they got the punishment of burying all the people they had killed into a mass grave before getting arrested and/or shot.

      The Holocaust is there, yes, but there’s two sides to every story. Just because the Jewish (and others) population suffered greatly, doesn’t mean the ethnic German population didn’t suffer as well. I’ve talked to someone who survived the Nazi concentration camps and even he doesn’t blame the German civilian population for this.

      War isn’t good for anyone as it ruins lives for innocent people on both sides. Remember that.

      Reply
      1. John Acton at |

        Not “Nazi” but German concentration camps. Nazi were not aliens in Germany. Nor were German soldiers. They were Germans. I observe that the notion of “Nazis” is abused and overused. It leads a public opinion to believe that there were those nasty Nazis and poor Germans, the latter having nothing in common with the former. Nazis were Germans, moreover they were given power in democratic elections, which is a clear indication, that German population did not oppose Hitler’s ideology too strongly.

        Reply
        1. seaScorpius at |

          Most of German civilians didn’t condone of the concentration camps so it’s generally regarded as a Nazi-controlled concentration camp (despite that being a good piece of logic too). No, the Nazi’s weren’t aliens they were all of German/Austrian blood mainly but even the German population of today don’t want to be associated with them for obvious reasons. Yes, Nazi’s is overused as they weren’t the only facist country/army of that era as there were also Mussolini and King Franco and maybe some others afterwards. Also, due to Hitler wanting to be a dictator he did the smart/stupid thing of forcing the hand. Most people were bullied by Hitler’s right hand man to vote for him and no one could do anything about it. The point I was trying to make is don’t point the finger at the German civilians and say “they deserve it”. That’s really ignorant. Kids can’t vote. Are you saying it’s their fault? They deserve to die? I don’t think so. Don’t be to quick to judge what you don’t know. You weren’t there were you? Remember this: All school history books have some prejudice/propaganda and bias in them.

          Reply
          1. John Acton at |

            @Seascorpius
            You’ve had some good points. You are definitely right, that man cannot punish children for sins of their fathers. Also the point “You weren’t there were you?” seem to make sense at first glance, but it applies to anyone discussing historical events older then 100 years. I am assuming it applies to you as well. So in longer term it makes no sense.

            I did study some history of pre WWII Germany. It is a longer discussion of why NSDAP has won elections, but people were definitely not forced to give their votes on them. Once NSDAP grabbed the power – then, yes, they started to bully their opponents in Germany.

            I do not stand on a position that Germans are genetically murderous nation. Nor I stand on a position that they were in a large group fooled and bullied by very narrow group of Nazis. First of all, Nazis were not such a narrow group. Secondly, recent researches seem to prove, that reputed as army-of-people-of-honour Wermaht also committed many crimes on civilians and POWs.

            Germans were not expelled because they had German gens. As I said many of them were fleeing themselves, to avoid justice.

            And first of all – level of suffering, level of received cruelty and number of killed people (killed during expulsion, not all Germans killed during WWII) by no mean can be compared with that applied to nations enslaved by Germans.

            Once again – it is not about denial of suffering of German civilians. It about the fact, that substantially, Germans should not be on the list before their victims. And Jews were not the only, and not the biggest victim.

            Reply
            1. dmb at |

              Ridiculous. Maybe you should research why exactly Hitler went to war. These ethnic Germans, for whom you have no empathy, were being slaughtered in territory once Germany’s, by the NKVD in Poland…which means by Jews.. The number 6 million is a ridiculous overstatement for what happened in the case of the internment of domestic agitators, not all of whom were Jewish. Deaths in the camps mirror the starvation of German citizens that resulted from the bombings toward the end of the war. All Germans were suffering, the interned in the camps suffered more than ever, and typhus spread. That’s what happened, and as soon as some of these huckster ‘survivors’ start dying off we MIGHT get popular recognition of the truth in coming years (although plenty of survivors talk about camp orchestras and cantinas in Buchenwald, a soccer field in Auschwitz, etc.). Nonetheless, all of Europe at the time was terrified of Bolshevism, a Jewish phenomenon. Everyone at the time, including the Pope, Churchill, Hitler, many Jews, YOU NAME HIM, he knew it. They killed millions and millions, in horrible ways, in Russia, Romania, Bavaria, Hungary – all brutal, all Jewish. Shame on you, for swallowing some nonsense and dishonoring the victims of history, in whose name INNOCENT Jews also suffered!

    2. Karol at |

      I agree. Number 8 “Expulsion of Ethinic Germans” should not be here. Although I have different reason on this. Number 8 is just part of 2: “The Stalinist Era in USSR (1929-1953)”. The expulsion of Germans wasn’t just a genocide of Germans, but it was a result of Stalin’s policy to many nations, and was mostly just an expulsion. In that area (and times) many nations were suffering (killing/starvation/bad conditions). There were other nations that suffered even more than Germans from Stalin’s policy, e.g. Ukrainians, Poles, and even Rusians. And some of the actions agains some other groups/nations was “true” genocide (killing by order, in case of German it was mostly starvation/bad conditions/incidental actions of demoralized soldiers). According to the text, half million of 14 milions was dead, which is 3.5% of population. This is clearly less than, for example, man-made famine (Terror-Famine) in Soviet Ukraine in 1932-1933 – the death toll is estimated as between 2 and 8 milion people. Why not put on the list the Ukrainian Terror-Famine instead of the German Expulsion (death tall 2-8 milion vs. 0.5 milion)? They both are the part of Stalinist Era. This should be just “One of biggest Expulsions” (in hard times/bad conditions) – not genocide.

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    3. Carl Street at |

      I guess we will FINALLY have to let the German and Japanese people off the hook…

      All my life I have heard about how it was right to hold the German and Japanese people en masse responsible for the atrocities of WWII because they did NOTHING to stop the criminals running their respective states.

      Well, Americans, apparently NOW owe these people a massive apology for our self-righteous moralizing that has lasted for decades.

      For even as we sit here American Military Personnel are performing the VERY acts for which we HANGED German and Japanese Military Personnel — including torture; mass executions; reprisals, show trials kidnapping, assassinations, secret prisons, etc.

      And, the American populace daily cheers for aerial blitzkrieg bombing of civilians much as the “but I was not a Nazi” German population did…

      And what about the sanctimonious carping about how the German people should have known about the Nazi Death Camps???

      How do YOU know that the Guantanamo “detention camp” is NOT an Auschwitz?? Or are you applying a double standard that holds the German people responsible for believing THEIR criminal government; but YOU can be forgiven for believing YOURS??

      WELL????

      Let’s hear those apologies you self-righteous hypocrites – unless you are from the might-makes-right group that REALLY believes the ONLY German and Japanese real war crime was losing the war!

      Reply
  5. John Acton at |

    I think that placing expulsion of Germans on the list is a rather risky decision. First of all, significant amount of Germans were not expelled. It was their decision to flee. And the reason for this flee was obvious. Many Germans wanted to avoid responsibility and justice for all the crimes they committed. Undoubtedly, there were also Germans who were just victims of the fact that the borders between countries has moved. But still, many of Germans actively participated in genocides of other nations (Ukrainians, Poles, Jews, Gypsies). Many “innocent” German farmers migrated to countries conquered by Germany to take over conquered farms, animals, equipments and use inhabitants as slaves.
    Germans suffered after the WWII, no one denies that. But they definitely did not suffer as much as the nations, which they enslaved and exterminated. Especially Slavic nations and Jews, which Germans considered animals, not deserving human treatment. Therefore, what has happened to Germans after WWII should find its place on the list of genocides. However it definitely does not deserve to make it in the 1st 10, secondly by no means it should appear before genocides, which Germans applied to other nations.

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  6. Konrad Kalbarczyk at |

    All is quite fine, except number 8. “Pretty close to genocide”. Hilarious. Why not Texas chainsaw massacre?

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  7. Fabio at |

    8. Expulsion of Ethnic Germans after World War II (1945)

    Somebody was avoiding history lessons… Dear journalist at first google ‘holocaust’ and then find out why Germans were asked to leave occupied and destroyed by them country.

    Reply
  8. Mark at |

    What about native americans?

    Reply
    1. Martin Fierro at |

      That is in the Other Note Worthy examples after #1

      Reply
    2. Christina at |

      Didn’t you read the note at the top? Evidently this is an opinion piece, not a researched piece. The author here doesn’t think the intentional extermination of Native American’s counts, however. There is actual documentation that U.S. soldiers intentionally gave American Indians blankets contaminated with smallpox, in addition to settling warring tribes on the same small reservations with the hopes that they would kill each other off, among other hideous “genocidal” facts. In the opening paragraph the author arbitrarily discounts this information with no proof however.

      I am terrified to ask the author, but were the crusades considered either? While those wonderful, crusading fools didn’t manage to wipe out the entire middle East, they did manage to eliminate the Byzantines completely while they were killing Jews, Byzantines, Christians and Muslims alike. Their goal was to rid the earth of non-Christians and reclaim the Holy Lands. Seems to me that qualifies as genocide via the dictionary definition of the term, and the death tolls at the hands of the Crusades is a lot higher than most on your list…

      Reply
  9. Marek at |

    What about Hiroshima and Nagasaki? What about Indians? hipocrits

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    1. 5minutes at |

      Hiroshima and Nagasaki were not attempts to wipe out the Japanese Race. In fact, one could argue that the reason the bombs were dropped was to save Japanese lives by forcing a quick surrender.

      The Indian Wars also were not attempts to wipe out the Indian race, although there were admittedly some who wanted to do so.

      Reply
      1. Marek at |

        How many people must die to called it genocide?

        Btw if Indian Wars weren’t genocide and Hiroshima bombing too why #8 appears?

        and #10 WTF? A lot people are saying that Bible is BS but when deaths appears in this book they shout it’s genocide! :/

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      2. Marek at |

        The Indian case is much closer to genocide than #8, you can find it even in wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genocides_in_history

        H&N – a lot of people died or suffered serious illness after the explosion

        Reply
        1. Martin Fierro at |

          oh well if Wikipedia says so…

          Reply
  10. A Pole who cares at |

    The whole top 10 doesn’t look right to me; What about 6 milion of Poles (incl. 3 milions of Polish Jews), who lost their lives as effect of German occupation started in 1939 until 1945?? Sonder Aktion Krakau, Palmiry Forest, Warsaw Uprising alone (200k civilians murdered!) and many more; Poland is now estimated to have lost between 4.9 and 5.7 million citizens at the hands of the Germans. Between 150,000 – 1 million more died at the hands of the Soviets.In total, right about 6 million Polish citizens lost. (just Imagine, proportionally losing 30 million US citizens or ~ 12,000 citizens/a day – wouldn’t you call that a Top Ten genocide?)

    The vast majority were civilians. _The daily average in Polish lives was 2,800_ as the war continued until May 2 1945. Poland’s professional classes suffered higher than average casualties with Doctors (45%), lawyers (57%), University professors (40%), technicians (30%), clergy (18%) and many journalists.

    Doesn’t that qualify to be one of the most horrific atrocities committed to a single nation?!

    Germans suffered mainly as effect of hostilies started by their own government! Please, read some more decent history sources (Timothy Snyder, Norman Davies, Ian Kershaw, Anthony Beevor) before putting anything of that kind on websites risking it being flawed.

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    1. A.N. at |

      Well, what about 12 million russian civilians..and 3,5 million russian war prisoners…Killed by nazis

      Reply
  11. R at |

    If the expulsion of Germans is a genocide, so what is this ? (Warsaw in 1945 on the picture):

    http://naszastolica.waw.pl/images/fot-arch-muranow/fot-9.jpg

    Also, what about millions of Poles murdered by Germans during WWII ?

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  12. D. at |

    I think both comments about nr 8 are too calm. You just can’t write such things unless you’re a complete political-historical novice/ignorant or a relative to a german WW2 nazist or neonazist (like those “scholars”). Describing invaders (settlers of the NAtionalsoZIalismus) as victims is a crime on common memory and …common sense. It’s not about the balls to make such “risky” judgments, it’s about breathtaking arrogance and conceit. Shame!

    Reply
  13. Exlibris at |

    The Reservations in the United States could logically be considered concentration camps. Often the land was extremely poor and placing hunter/gather societies onto small areas of land without educating them about agriculture led to starvation. And of course waging germ warfare with smallpox laden materials certainly can be considered active genocide. There has been thoughts that before European settlement in the Americas the native population was on par or even in excess of that of Europe. Within 200 years estimates of up to 90% of the native population were wiped out due to war and illness.

    Reply
  14. D. at |

    By the way, do we think about the same “many” “scholars”?, any names, please?, and for the readers – in Germany it’s a strictly political issue, read about bloody nazi judge Hans Krüger – first chairman (1959–64) of the Bund der Vertriebenen (since 1998 – Erika Steinbach) and Rudi Pawelka from Preußische Treuhand (two biggest advocates of this issue). – What they want?, what are their political purposes? – Pawelka wants actually …money, Steinbach wants to soften german responsibility for a war atrocities, you know.. “we were not the only bad guys”, etc… – So, Jeff Danelek, a Denver, Colorado author, you have been manipulated into a real political struggle that has nothing to do, sorry to say this, with the real history. Bad thing is that you probably won’t edit your top ten – and lie will win, the reality will be dimmer and more deceitful.

    Reply
  15. D. at |

    And last thing, as an American, you should consider as a genocide – the “job” Planned Parenthood is doing (you know – “helping women”), ‘cuz of them all – there is no bigger and most horrific holocaust – than that done – on children conceived. (Just look for the numbers.. then add numbers from the other countries).

    Reply
    1. Konrad Kalbarczyk at |

      Yea!

      Reply
    2. Robert Gode at |

      Oh please enough of this crap about Planned Parenthood – your ignorance is sad to see. Millions of women receive all kinds of health care through Planned Parenthood, 3% receiving safe AND legal abortions. Take your religious bigotry elsewhere… it’s been the cause of the death and suffering of millions for centuries.

      Reply
  16. 5minutes at |

    A few points.

    1. Several of these really aren’t genocides per se. They may have resulted in the killing of a lot of people, but they weren’t the deliberate and systematic attempt to wipe out a targeted group of civilians. #’s 9, 8, 7, and 1 were all terrible situations, but not true genocides. I would also add the maltreatment of the American Indian to this list of terrible situations that resulted in a lot of death, but not true genocide. Ditto with things like the Nanking Massacre.

    2. In the attempt to add some of these mass killings, you’ve ignored some impressive genocides that would’ve made excellent additions. The attempted genocides during the Bosnian War of the 1990’s. More recently, the ethnic cleansing in Darfur. Saddam Hussein’s attempts to wipe out the Kurds. The Indonesian campaign in East Timor. Etc.

    Reply
    1. F at |

      East timor?
      Dude, the only reason indonesian came to timor is to block communism. It was know by both british and u.s leader of the time.

      As far as I know, indonesia gave timor special otonomi to rule himself (what natural resouces can you expect from timor compared to money spent to establish civilization there and rebuild things that crushed during the civil war between communist and democratic party when portuguise leave without building a decent goverment)

      Indonesia rule timor fo about 20 years, and give referendum that finally liberate timor. No communism and australia can wash their hands and act as hero.

      So where the genocide came from?

      Reply
      1. James in Tosa at |

        Genocide is genocide
        Just because people supported communism doesn’t give the Indonesia government a right to murdered 200,000 of them
        ….that’s a pretty absurd statement

        Reply
  17. Hobbes at |

    It’s just a matter of typing: German crimes against ethnic Poles in your google desktop. Over 6mi deaths, average 2,800/day. More than 50% of upper and professional class of the society killed. If these numbers don’t make it a one of the top ten genocide and the number 8 that you put still does, then I’d call the whole list utterly flawed.

    Reply
  18. Yosomono at |

    What no Belgium! King Leopold and his lackies killed MILLIONS. This picture sums up the horrors of the Belgians:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nsala_of_Wala_in_Congo_looks_at_the_severed_hand_and_foot_of_his_five-year_old_daughter,_1904.jpg

    Reply
    1. Peps at |

      Completely overlooked
      One of the worst, but practically forgotten

      Reply
  19. Konrad Kalbarczyk at |

    What about RU 486?

    Reply
  20. JF at |

    Number 8 seems to be kind of joke. Yeah. some may say that ordinary german families vere not Hitler supporters by 1945. But 10-15 years before, their chosen Hitler to be their chancelor. Germans were responsible for II WW. Yes, they were dying while being transported ot the west after the war, but the numbers given here are cited after some German activist (Erica Steinbach) who want to clear their responsibility for II WW and greatly enlarge number of casualties.
    BTW. Did you hear what Americans and allies did to Drezden in 1945, when almost only civilians were there? Please read “Soughterhouse no. 5″ by american WW II veteran and SF writer Kurt Vonnegut. There were more causalties, than from your nukes in Japan…. It was you – american who killed innocent German families and it seems there was nothing wrong about it. While after war all the people were dying because of hunger and sickness – not only Germans. And you say that it was a genocide in case of Germans, who are responsible for II WW?
    For me, Polish, a citizen of country that lost 6-10 mln people during II WW(20-30% population) and 40% of medics, 33% of tteachers, 30% of scienits and then in 1944 in Jalta sold to Stalin by Churchil and Roosvelt, for another 44 years of communist terror, for me this 8th biggest genocide is a bitchslap. Please, reconsider this selection.

    Reply
  21. SeanP at |

    “The Killing Fields” is a great drama that takes place in Cambodia during the Khmer regime.
    ————————–
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Killing_Fields_(film)

    Reply
  22. Defender at |

    WHat about the most recent? the ethnic cleansing of muslims from burma. the horrific murders of not only men but women and children. i encourage you to research it. it was recent, around june 2012.

    Reply
  23. Jurek Pryhozen at |

    I am appalled by the omission of the genocide of Native Americans. It is unconscionable to look at modern history and ignore this tragedy of the population of the two entire continents. Native American population was ruthlessly exterminated over many decades. This shameful crime was methodically carried out by the U.S. military and culminated with effective destruction of the Native American culture, expulsion of survivors from their land and their total humiliation. The fact that to this day there is no official recognition of this crime and not even a mention of the admission of responsibility is even more tragic. Shame!

    Reply
  24. Monika at |

    #8 8. Expulsion of Ethnic Germans? Misteake.
    What about Katyn? What about great hunger on Ukraine 1932/33?

    Your list sucks

    Reply
    1. A.N. at |

      What about 12 million russian civilians and 3,5 million russian POW:s..1941-45

      Reply
  25. Nathan at |

    Where is Darfur!? Not even an honorable mention!?

    Reply
  26. ThisListSux at |

    You gotta be kidding, right? This is a JOKE of a list. Expulsion of Germans?? Medi-whosits?? Not even ONE mention of any Native American genocides….and did you ever hear of these really bad hombres from a few hundred years ago called the Mongols?? Their genocides were of such epic proportions in some cases they changed the very direction of civilization ITSELF. (Read Iraq)

    In a perfect world, you would be banned from ever writing another list anywhere ever, and at best, even holding a semi-sharpened pencil for all the thought, care or research you devoted to this so-called “list”.

    Reply
  27. auto devis at |

    There are many genocides perpetrated through out history.
    the discovery of america both north and south and the centuries of oppression that followed to the the natives including the greatest civilizations known to man on that continent.
    how the colonial era of late 19th century the death toll could be bigger than many of the ones listed here.

    Reply
    1. KrisA at |

      Weren’t most of the deaths actually from diseases they had no immunity from, and later on, from alcoholism? That would make the death toll tragic, but not genocide.

      There’s a really fascinating book called “1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus” that makes the point that North America was not this pastoral wilderness the settlers found. The Native Americans had much more impact on their environment than was previously understood, including clearing out huge swatches of forest so that the wildlife they hunted would have more grassland and be easier to hunt and kill. Our ancestors went west and found the wilderness and teeming wildlife as it was because so many Indians had already died off from diseases and the land had reverted back to its primeval, mostly human-free state.

      Reply
  28. Joe at |

    You missed two big ones, the Mongul Conquests and the killing off of Native Americans.

    Reply
  29. Wayne at |

    I’ve always considered Julius Caesar’s “Conquest of Gaul” a particularly nasty genocide toward the Celtic peoples of Continental Europe. Any thoughts or comments?

    Reply
  30. Nathaniel Wenger at |

    Why don’t you like Nazis?

    Wengerocracy is a form of government where the people watch the ruler entirely amongst their reign. Wengerocracy prevents the leader of a country from covering up unlawful behavior going on.

    Why aren’t Germans writing and publishing books on the importance of instating wengerocracy after the holocaust?

    Why aren’t Germans writing and publishing books on the importance of instating wengerocracy before pol pot takes power?

    Why aren’t Germans writing and publishing books on the importance of instating wengerocracy in Cambodia?

    Why didn’t Germans write and publish books on the importance of instating wengerocracy before khmer rouge?

    Why don’t I like Germans?

    Reply
  31. KrisA at |

    I buy into “genocide” for the Germans expelled at the end of World War 2 for two reasons:

    1) they were expelled for being German, which fits the criteria for genocide: “the deliberate and systematic destruction, in whole or in part, of an ethnic, racial, religious, or national group” (Wikipedia again), and

    2) this definition has nothing to say about whether the ethnic, racial, religious, or national group in question deserved to die, in your opinion or anybody else’s.

    They were Germans, and Stalin, among others, was happy to assist in the extermination of a huge number of Germans at the end of WW2, because they were the evil, hated Germans. All groups that are treated thus are the evil, hated fill in your blank here. This is genocide.

    Reply
    1. Karol at |

      I thought that genocide means “killing” not “expulsion”. The deaths were mostly the result of starvation and diseases.

      Mayby it is a kind of genocide. But it should be #800 not #8.

      Reply
  32. taylor at |

    Should have looked look up the definition of genocide before compiling the list.

    Reply
  33. Tfan at |

    Yeah, if number 8th are Germans maybe you should put there also extermination of Persians at Thermopiles? These blood-thirsty Spartans killed so many of them there… In comparison to whole world population, or regular army size in these time it was a real genocide…

    Reply
  34. Adamos at |

    So where is Palestinian genocide by the Israeli? After WWII simply stating an opinion about Israeli crimes makes you “Antisemitic”. This is insane. Israel has been murdering Palestinian civilians, most of them children, in a daily basis for tor than a half century.

    Reply
  35. a9fc8yt3kd1 at |

    “unlike Russia and China, Germany had no history of such cruelty beforehand”

    That’s not true. Germans committed similar acts of genocide in their African colonies during the nineteenth centuries.

    Reply
  36. grt at |

    How can you not mention the Genocide on the Native Americans??? That’s typical US (better: not all US citizens, of course, but the typical stupid white christian rednecks that love their guns…), always busy pointing their fingers on others but systematically hushing up their own countless crimes. How the US treated the Native Americans was the inspiration for Hitler, btw.

    And making a Top 10 of Genocides is quite tasteless I think.

    Reply
    1. a9fc8yt3kd1 at |

      If you read the first two paragraphs, you will see that there is a clear explanation of why the treatment of the Indians at the hands of Euro-American immigrants was not included in this list. To begin with, although the arrival of Europeans in North America may have resulted in the deaths of tens of millions of Indians, most of those deaths were the result of the accidental introduction of European diseases to which Indians had no resistance.

      Of course, there were cases of diseases being introduced intentionally, such as the British purposefully giving the Ottowa people Smallpox infected blankets during Pontiac’s rebellion. However, no one at the time could have possibly anticipated how rapidly those diseases would spread, or how devastating they would be.

      Aside from disease, the next largest culprit in the deaths of all those tens of millions of Indians was also not overt violence, but was instead the result of starvation resulting from the mass expropriation of Indian land by the governments of Canada and the United States of America.

      A key distinction is that the massive numbers of white settlers who displaced the Indians and settled on Indian lands didn’t do so purposefully in order to purposefully kill the Indians through starvation. To the contrary, they did so merely in order create better lives for themselves. The mass starvation of the Indians was just an unfortunate byproduct of it, and not an intentional result thereof.

      Of course, this shouldn’t be interpreted as suggesting that every single white man, or white woman for that matter, who emigrated to the Americas and moved west, was innocent. Right from the start there were certain white people [Christopher Columbus being a notable example] who saw genocide and slavery as being the only suitable means of dealing with indigenous peoples.

      [Interestingly, from what I've read, Columbus and his men were all quite hated back in Spain as well. While the Spanish crown expended massive amounts of money, and massive numbers of Spanish soldiers died, in the reconquista of Spanish lands which had been seized by the Islamic caliphate in the middle ages, Columbus embezzled massive amounts of money, spent it on himself, and was also horrifically cruel to the Spanish peasants.]

      Despite a popular misconception, people in Europe had known since the time of the ancient Greeks that the earth was round, and approximately what its circumference was. However, after the fall of the Byzantine empire to the Ottoman Turks, Europe was cut off from its previously lucrative trade routes to East Asia.

      At the time, most scholars in Europe knew the approximate size of the earth, and knew that East Asia was too far away from Europe to get to by sailing west. However, Columbus did his own calculation of the size of the earth, and dramatically miscalculated. He thought the earth was much smaller than it really was, and that it would therefore be possible to get to Asia by sailing around the opposite side of the world.

      Now, the Spanish monarchy hated Columbus because he was so corrupt, and so when he presented his plan to the king and queen of Spain, they saw it as a convenient way to get rid of him. [They didn't actually expect Columbus to survive the journey.]

      So, they gave Columbus three of the smallest ships they could find, gave him a crew of thieves, murderers and rapists from the local jail [people they also never wanted to see again] and sent them on what was, as far as I know, the longest voyage in history at that time, [and yes, I've heard about the voyages of the eunuch admiral Zheng He].

      At the time, nobody in Spain knew that the Americas even existed. Essentially, Columbus and his men were a motley crew of worthless criminals who were crammed onto boats and sent out to sea in the hope that they would never return. They were thieves, murderers and rapists back in Europe, and when they arrived in the Americas, they continued to be thieves, murderers and rapists.

      Later, when other people in Spain realized that what Columbus had discovered was an entirely new world, and when they heard about all of the terrible thing which Columbus did there, Columbus was banished from the Spanish colonies in the Americas.

      The early period of European colonization of the Americas was largely characterized by people like Columbus enslaving and mass-murdering American Indians entirely to satisfy their own greed. However, if you read the actual historical accounts written by white settles during the period of westward expansion, most do not express the sort of seething, genocidal hatred which typically characterizes events such as the Nazi holocaust or the Rwandan genocide.

      In many of the original historical accounts written by European settles, [for instance: the Little House series] the writers express a certain amount of sympathy for the plight of the American Indians, and a certain amount of regret that the westward expansion of Euro-American civilization was causing so much suffering on the part of the indigenous people.

      In fact, from what I have read, it would appear that throughout the eighteen-hundreds it was primarily the white women, rather than the white men, who regularly advocated the mass-murder of the Indians. [Tell that to a typical feminist!] Nonetheless, the overall attitude of the white man toward the Indian during that period appears to have been primarily a combination of regret and stoicism, rather than of true hatred.

      Unfortunately, even though the vast majority of white settlers who migrated westward did not do so specifically in order to cause suffering to indigenous people, the continuous westward expansion of white settlers did nonetheless cause terrible suffering, largely due to starvation resulting from the expropriation of Indian lands, on the part of indigenous people.

      Unfortunately, this widespread starvation and suffering often led to immense hatred, on the part of the Indian, toward the white settlers. This frequently led to acts of horrific violence on the part of the Indians, toward the white settlers. Among such acts of violence were things such as the indiscriminate killing of white settlers, the mutilation of the genitals of the white settlers after they had been killed, the cutting open of the bellies of pregnant white women, the removal of their unborn children, the nailing of those unborn children to trees, and countless similar things.

      It is important to note that the Indian nations as a whole did not only do these things to white settlers. They had been subjecting one-another to similar atrocities since time immemorial, and they also subjected countless African-Americans, both slave and free, to the same sort of cruelty. [Many Indian nations practiced the enslavement of African-Americans as well.]

      Unfortunately, this widespread retaliatory violence on the part of American Indians toward white settlers continuously fed hatred and resentment on the part of white settlers toward American Indians, which probably would not have existed otherwise.

      Unfortunately, this hatred and resentment on the part of white settlers toward American Indians further led to sporadic killings of American Indians by settlers, militiamen, and after the illegal creation of the United States Army during the American civil war, by federal soldiers as well. Although most of these settlers, soldiers and militiamen were white men, some of them were also freed black men who either had joined the US army or a state militia, or else migrated westward to escape racial prejudice.

      Unfortunately, the frequent and barbaric violence perpetrated by American Indians upon white settlers perpetually fueled an ever deeper and deeper, and ever more and more bitter, hatred of American Indians by many white men and women, which was compounded in each successive generation by the continued violence.

      The vast majority of deaths of American Indians during the period of westward expansion were not the result of any concerted effort on the part of the white man to exterminate the Indians, but were merely an unintended consequence of the accidental introduction of European diseases, and of the perpetual theft of Indian lands.

      However, in the later half of the nineteenth century and throughout most of the twentieth century, the aforementioned hatred of American Indians, fueled by the aforementioned retaliatory violence, on the part of American Indians, toward white men and women, gave rise to numerous policies which were explicitly genocidal toward the Indians.

      Among these were practices such as the mass killings of herds of American bison [not "buffalo"] in order to purposefully reduce the populations of the Sioux tribes through starvation; the offering, by the US postal service, of bounties on the scalps of Indian children; the utterly appalling abuses [murder, rape and torture, forced lobotomies, electroshock therapy, surgical sterilizations, forced abortions and other medical experiments, and countless other atrocities] perpetrated upon indigenous children in the residential schools in the US and Canada during the twentieth century [I think Australia might have done the same things to their indigenous children, but I would have to look it up to be sure.]; and the involuntary surgical sterilizations of numerous Indian women during the nineteen-sixties and nineteen-seventies. [That's right, the NINETEEN-sixties and NINETEEN-seventies!]

      Here’s a question for you:

      What do the American abortion industry, the Catholic sex-abuse scandal, and racism toward American Indians, all have in common?

      The answer:

      The American abortion industry started out as a way to prevent American Indian teenage girls from giving birth after they were raped [real rape, not phony statutory rape] and impregnated by Christian priests in the residential schools, in an attempt to cover up the abuses which were occurring there. Remember that next time someone tells you that abortion is about a woman’s “right to chose”!

      In summary, although the vast majority of deaths of American Indians due to European colonization of the Americas were not the result of any concerted effort on the part of the white man to exterminate the Indians, but were instead merely an unfortunate byproduct of the aforementioned colonization, the conflict between the Indian and the white man did eventually give rise to numerous individual acts on the part of white men and women which were explicitly genocidal towards American Indians.

      Furthermore, although none of those individual genocidal acts may have occurred on anywhere near the scale of something such as the Nazi holocaust, the cruelty and callousness with which they were perpetrated was in most cases as terrible if not more so than anything which the author listed in this article.

      In particular, although the abuses in the Indian residential school system may not have affected nearly as many people as many of the events listed in this article, in terms of pure hatred and cruelty, I would consider it to be by far the single most despicable act which any civilization has ever committed.

      The victims the residential school system were not dangerous criminals, thieves or murderers. Rather, they were the most innocent of children, totally undeserving of what was done to them. The Indian children did not live separately from their abusers as did the Jews in Auschwitz, Dachau or Treblinka. Rather, they lived in close proximity. Their abusers knew their names and their faces, and yet still they were brutally tortured and killed.

      The torture and murder was not carried out indirectly by cold, unfeeling machines such as the Nazi gas chambers, to spare the abusers the guilt which might arise from seeing their victims’ humanity. Instead, the torture and murder was intimately hands on, and face-to-face. It was not a sudden, uncontrolled outburst of violence such as in Rwanda. Rather, the horrific tortures and killings of Indian children in the residential school system were frighteningly well-planned and well-orchestrated, and continued for decades.

      The perpetual rape, torture and murder was not the fault of only a few evil persons perpetrating such abuses on their own initiative and without the knowledge or sanction of their superiors. On the contrary, the abuses in the residential school system were orchestrated and sanctioned at the absolute highest levels of the governments of the nations in which they occurred.

      Although other individuals have attempted to apologize by proxy for the abuses which were committed, it does not appear that any of the specific individuals responsible for those abuses has ever expressed any remorse therefore. [At least some of the guards at Nazi death camps were sorry for what they did!]

      Lastly, although a small number of the individuals responsible for some of these abuses are currently in the process of being held legally accountable, it is unlikely that the vast majority of persons responsible for those abuses will ever be held accountable for their actions, especially since many of them have long since died.

      For these reasons, I consider the abuses in the Indian residential school system to be overwhelmingly the most vile and despicable act ever perpetrated by any civilization in history.

      Reply
      1. TopTenz Master at |

        Congratulations, you have published the longest comment in history of TopTenz.net (2,158 words), which is longer than 99% of our posts.

        Reply
      2. april at |

        I have to disagree with your comment about the Native American genocide. I’ve had the opportunity to read about the “trail of tears” and many other tricks that the white settlers did to the Native Americans. It was all about greed, they wanted what the Natives had and that’s all there is to it. They forced hundred of Natives to walk over 800 miles from their land to have them settle in an area in which they were not familiar and thats only part of it. They consistently were lied to the Natives saying that if they sign a treaty they will be taken care of. They were also killed if they were Native and another interesting piece of fact was that they were stripped of their culture. I don’t know about you but I think if another society came here and tried to change everything that we are I would have a problem with that. Genocide is a horrible thing to do to any group of people no matter what the situation is.

        Reply
      3. aaa@a.com at |

        Bla bla bla, typical brain damaged American capitalism lover.

        Reply
  37. croatia at |

    No.1
    Srebrenica, (Bosnia and Herzegovina), 1995.

    Reply
    1. A.N. at |

      Well, at Jasonevic the croats murdered about 900000 serbs an others

      Reply
  38. seth at |

    It is true that most of the deaths of Natives were caused ny disease, but after the small pox epidemic the colonial empires and the US killed natives until 1918 with a death toll of 50 million and the killing cuntinues in Latin America and the Amazon with a death toll in the hundreds of thousands so yes, that is genocide.

    Reply
    1. liberty at |

      No it is not 75-90% of the deaths were do to small pox which the Europeans did not intentionally bring over

      Reply
  39. Owen Howell at |

    Surely the atlantic slave trade has to come at the top of this list: sure, it’s hard to quantify how many died or were displaced as a direct or indirect result of slavery, and it doesn’t often figure in this list because it happened over 400years, but it was a type of genocide. Genghis Khan (14th century) probably killed more than Stalin but slightly less than Zedong (40 million). Some maintain that more Native Americans died in the colonisation of north America than in the holocaust. A bit of a dubious list.

    Reply
    1. gargag at |

      The bloodiest civilization/nation in history is…. China. few people know that. It had large scale armies, disastrous dynastic turnovers that killed millions, even in ancient and medeval times.

      Reply
  40. asaredding at |

    Modern Humans started with the Neanderthal Genocide. Killing is in our DNA!

    ” The universe is hostile. so Impersonal. devour to survive.
    So it is. So it’s always been.”
    (Tool 2006)

    Reply
  41. Sim at |

    What about the 1984 genocide planned by the Indian Government against Sikhs in India. Thousands of Sikhs were killed by organised mobs of Hindus and justice is yet to be served despite annual protests and marches from the Sikh community all around the world.

    Reply
  42. David Zulak at |

    Your initial comment claims that the small pox epidemic that killed such a huge number of Native Americans was “unintentional.” It is unfortunate that you are perpetuating a lie. There are U.S. congressional records clearly promoting and outlining the shipping of infected blankets collected from eastern locations (where Native Americans were dying from an outbreak of small pox) and shipped out west and given to Native Americans there – given under the guise of ‘donations’ or as part of treaty obligations meant to compensate these people for being moved off their traditional lands. Shame on you! Shame! You are a genocide denier.
    “However, the overwhelming majority of those deaths were due to smallpox being inadvertently introduced into a native population that lacked the biological means to resist it which, while devastating, was not a genocide as it was not done intentionally” Another apologist who claims to decry the crimes of others but wants to hide the dirty hands of their own country.

    Reply
  43. Technocrat at |

    How quaint. the slave trade isn’t mentioned once in this list. From 1452 to 1807, European nations carried out an intentional and relentless attempt to subjugate or annihilate all nonwhites/nonchristians IN THE WORLD. But I guess that just doesn’t count, despite resulting in 355 years worth of deaths from abuse, disease, malnutrition, exposure, et al.

    Reply
  44. Looki at |

    What about the on-going genocide of Afrikaners in South Africa?

    Reply
  45. Kristy at |

    I am appalled you said what happened to the native Americans wasn’t a form of genocide. How dare you! what the English did to us with smallpox was intentional. They were doing the same methods of germ warfare in other parts of Europe before coming to America. you are wrong. Not only was small pox purposely introduced but so was yersenia pestis, and tuberculosis. WRONG!!

    Reply
  46. Earth child at |

    Your list just a disgrace to those who believe that all life is important, that no one race is superior. What about the slave trade, Congo, Ethiopia etc… What about the original settlers of now America killed by Indians who in turn got killed. What about those Indians!

    Reply
  47. bcdude at |

    are you kidding,ya sure those were terrible,despicable atrocities,nothing compares to the genocide of the N American natives,whole nations were destroyed,over one hundred million killed in 400 years,biggest cover up in the history of mankind,historians keep ignoring that fact,why?

    Reply
  48. Ikhtiyar at |

    I wonder how you failed to include the genocide carried out by Pakistani Soldiers during their occupation of then West Pakistan. Although estimates largly vary, some 300000 to 3 million people were killed by Pakistanis. They also systematically targeted and killed Prominent Intellectuals during the last months of the war in order to ensure that the country is rendered talent less.

    Reply
  49. A.N. at |

    Of course you dont even mention the worst genocide in history..which is /should be nr. 1 : the genocide of 120 million native indians in America

    Reply
  50. A.N. at |

    The killing of 3.5 russian war prisoners by the nazis is not even mentioned….

    Reply
  51. Sheikh at |

    The genocide of the native american indian tribes at the hands of the european colonists should have made the top ten list.

    At least the top 15.

    Reply
  52. boku at |

    Well, america is probably the most long slow killing country on the planet with it’s good “capitalism” e starving and social economic differences. This is, of course, a well researched list. But Japanese Unit 731 was almost worst then nazis itself and north america (united states specific) will always be the number one long lasting killing machine.

    Reply
  53. Kelly at |

    They seem to have left out one of the largest, Native Americans!

    Reply
  54. A.N. at |

    The biggest of them all was the killing of native indians…

    Reply
  55. Radox at |

    The Bangladesh Genocide [at the time, called East Pakistan] by West Pakistani government/military with a body count of 3 million has to be up there.

    What’s even more strange is how this period in history is not very well-known despite being so recent [culminating in the liberation of said country in 1971].

    Reply
  56. jayo at |

    So the author denies that the organized murder and deportation of numerous Native American tribes was a genocide? That’s just… wow… I’m speechless. Now, there are only two possibilities, either he is just plain stupid and ignorant or he is a racist.

    Reply
  57. jayo at |

    Dear “person who runs this site”,
    I would appreciate if you would consider choosing your writers more wisely. The way that Jeff Danalek deals with this topic is inappropriate and I for my part consider his definition of genocide and why it would not apply to Native Americans as quite offensive. Especially if you consider that white supremacists usually use the very same argument to justify the massmurder of the indigenous people!
    I understand that this lists don’t want to be complete, they cannot be. They don’t want to be the most accurate, they cannot be. They just want to be lists of random facts and generate interest. I know this! But this list crossed the line. It reads like an agenda to me, the author seems to really dislike communists. This list just stinks.
    So, for the future: better stick to fun facts like “Top 10 bubblegums” or something like that. But if you really want to deal with delicate topics like genocide, then treat it with dignity and get your facts straight.
    In case you wonder, no, I’m not Native American. And while I maybe cannot even imagine what they must have suffered (and a lot of them still do!) I know this: to play down their tragedy to justify one’s own conscience is a crime of its own.

    Reply
  58. Loxfin at |

    What…. Not listing the up to 100 million or so native americans. this site just lost a reader.

    Reply
  59. Chuck Ruffing at |

    UNITED STATES OF AMERICA! OVER A HUNDRED MILLION NATIVE AMERICANS KILLED IN THE LARGEST GENOCIDE IN KNOWN HISTORY!

    That this site refused to list the Native American genocide just goes to show how badly they fail to report the truth.

    Reply
    1. Shell Harris at |

      We don’t refuse anything of the kind. The very fact you wrote it in the comments refutes your very statement. In fact, you aren’t the first person to mention it. The author gave his reasons for his inclusions. Toptenz.net accepts lists from many writers and sometimes people disagree with those lists. We have no agendas.

      Reply
      1. Charles N. at |

        Shell Harris, I would like to make a rebuttal. The colonists wanted the land that the Native Americans lived on, and they did literally DID ANYTHING THEY COULD TO GET THE LAND. They would give them blankets and supplies with the Smallpox virus in exchange for knives and guns, and then stab them in the back a couple of weeks later. Have you ever heard of the Trail of Tears? Or Wounded Knee? What about King Philips’ War? Each and every time, they killed them and enslaved the survivers. There was this one Native Americn chief who liked the colonists, and as wiling to barter some of their land for supplies. One night, however, a man snuck into his home and killed his family. Does that sound like it was accidental to you?

        Reply
  60. James in Tosa at |

    I guess the victors write the history books & this author cherry picks the genocides from the perspective of an American victor. It’s appalling that Native American genocides aren’t mentioned & I think it’s a lame excuse to say that’s because they weren’t done on purpose. Really? Are you telling me the Trail of Tears….a forced march of Indians from the east coast to Oklahoma wasn’t done on purpose? Women & children dying, drowning as they were forced across rivers wasn’t done on purpose?
    But you did remember to mention the expulsion of ethnic Germans which was a lot milder than the ‘Trail of Tears” And you did remember to mention the famine caused by Joseph Stalin’s collectivization efforts. Wait! Wait! That wasn’t done on purpose either. Stalin didn’t intend for all those peasants to die. He was just trying to get them to produce crops for the cities. So why did the author include that part of Stalin’s killings?
    BTW, why didn’t the author include the transatlantic African slave trade & the labor plantations blacks were thrown on. 100s of thousands of blacks perished because of those efforts. White American slave owners working a person to death on a plantation is no different than Stalin working some peasants to death. But that’s not the case in fantasy land & revisionist history

    Reply
  61. An interested partyy at |

    What point is there to make a Top10 of genocides, all of them were horrific and we’ve learned nothing from it!!!

    Reply
  62. Just So Damn Curious at |

    How on God’s green earth, can you use the Bible to reference an item of genocide? Furthermore, one’s belief should not factor into what is known and tangible to human history. I was about to hail this article as a well written and well researched affair until I saw you made it frivolous and irrelevant. Unfortunately when I continued reading I found the piece replete with mistakes grammatically and historically. Great piece of fluff. Couldn’t use this even if i was compelled.

    Reply
  63. Charles N. at |

    Holy crap, I cannot believe my eyes. How the hell is the Native American genocide not listed? The US government forced MY people off their land in exchange for disease, starvation, exhaustion, and death by the most painful and slow means?! Have you heard of Wounded Knee? 300 unarmed men, women, and children were killed. The Lakota who were killed had also surrendered, and already had submit. The early colonists INTENTIONALLY gave the natives items infected with Smallpox, and then would sneak out into the night and kill them with their knives and rifles. Get your facts straight, or get new authors who can do a better job than this. You are just another person who wants the horrific acts of the US Government and early colonists covered up.

    Reply
  64. Bill at |
    Reply
  65. Christina Whellen at |

    Mass murder of native americans was genocide. the writer over here is trying to say disease was by accident but the white settlers purposely gave the natives blankets infected with small pox so that all of them die. Do your research properly u biased author.

    Reply

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