21 Responses

  1. Peter Boucher at |

    I saw #5 “Sybil” (1976) when I was in my early days of high school on TV. If any actor or actress deserved the Emmy award for best actress in a movie made for TV, it was unquestionably Sally Field as Sybil. There is a bit of a twist to it. Sybil’s psychiatrist / doctor in the movie was the great actress Joanne Woodward who a couple of decades earlier starred in the movie “Three Faces Of Eve” (1957) in which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

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  2. rajimus123 at |

    great list. i love the way an actor can bring out such seemingly diverse characters and have you sympathize with each one of them. I think another good movie (although i’m not 100% sure that its not split personality and jsut psychopathy) is Serial Mom, theres a crazy internal conflict going on when you watch it that makes it hard for you to reconcile the fact that a sweet, caring mom is a mass murderer.

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  3. Wrake at |

    You missed “The Three Faces of Eve.”

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    1. Peter Boucher at |

      @ wrake. Please read my comment which is the first one. I mentioned Joanne Woodward in “Three Faces Of Eve” and the fact that she won the Academy award in 1957 for her portrayal

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  4. ParusMajor at |

    Please mind your spelling. It’s Dr.Jekyll, without the c.

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    1. TopTenz Master at |

      Thanks for minding it for us. The correction has been made.

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  5. Kyle at |

    Patrick Bateman from American Psycho belongs on here. In the novel, he had a whole chapter where he narrated all of his actions in third person. And was seeing things. He’d forget people he killed and killed Paul Allen(Owen in the novel), but it turned out he had probably killed a friend of his who he had mistaken for him.

    You could also put Donnie Darko, Dexter, Curtis from Take Shelter, or even Alice in Wonderland.

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  6. sarah at |

    Tara from the United States of Tara is a wonderful example of this disease and belongs on this list.

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    1. ? at |

      “Movie” characters.

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  7. Stephen Cook at |

    Re: #5, Sybil, it’s now coming out that Sybil was pretty much a hoax. Shirley Mason, the real life Sybil, had emotional problems, but didn’t display multiple personalities until her psychiatrist, Dr. Cornelia Wilbur, began injecting her with very strong drugs. Wilbur wanted to be a rock star in psychiatry, and the character of Sybil is probably about as real as the Amityville Horror. Shirley Mason definitely had psychiatric problems, but Wilbur was also involved in the “repressed memory” scandal, and it’s likely that much of the book was manufactured because it would get her attention, fame and money.

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  8. Sibbs at |

    Uhh… Shutter Island wasn’t Dissasociative Identity Disorder. Teddy had Schizophrenia. So did the Narrator in Fight Club. Sure, looking on the outside symptom of the alternate identities will make you think it was DID but if you examine all the symptoms carefully it really is Schizophrenia. In Fight Club, the narrator not only has Tyler Durden, he talks to Tyler Durden, he fights Tyler Durden. Much of his narration is incoherent and he is completely delusional. I believe they actually stated that Teddy was Schizophrenic in Shutter Island.

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    1. lindy at |

      I was going to explain, but he explains it better in this article as far as Shutter Island and Dissociative Identity Disorder goes:
      http://voices.yahoo.com/shutter-island-accurate-portrayal-psychopathology-5777550.html?cat=5

      Schizophrenia really is just an umbrella term for one with a mixture of multiple, different disorders and conditions.
      You CAN have a dissociative disorder with Schizophrenia as those with Dissociative Identity Disorder often have other disorders and conditions as well.

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  9. Nagem at |

    I find DID intriguing yet sometimes horribly portrayed in movies. I was recently diagnosed with Dissocative Disorder myself and since then watching movies about it make me a little angry. I still like them but most people with DID do not have that “monster’ side to them, there are parts of them that are still children or very scared/shy to express things. Though in my case my other half is a but scary the majority of her personality is good although rebellious…it should not be always portrayed as such in movies.

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  10. Jack at |

    You totally forgot about Norman Osborn from Spider-Man (2002).

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  11. Cookie at |

    Two things about this list surprise me: a) All but one character listed is male, when a disproportionate percentage people diagnosed with DID are female. b) I’m shocked that I’ve never seen Bette Davis’ character ‘Baby’ Jane Hudson in Whatever Happened to Baby Jane characterized as having DID. As a person who lives with DID myself, I find it to be one of the more accurate, honest and unsensationalized portrayals I’ve seen in film, perhaps largely because no one in the film ever refers to her ‘personalities’ but is obviously aware of them. The mood swings, childlike dress and behavior, particularly the defiance/fear in the face of authority, are all characterists I (and my family) are familiar with and the suggestion of incest between Jane and her father (further reinforced by her lifelong devotion/obsession) seem to suggest DID all the more, as it is most commonly linked to childhood abuse.

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    1. Peter Boucher at |

      @ Cookie : I am saddened to read that you suffer from DID. “What Ever Happened To Baby Jane (1962) was on TV just yesterday on the TCM channel and I watched it. One of the ironies was that Joan Crawford as Baby Jane’s sister portrayed the long suffering sister of Jane (Bette Davis) as we all look upon Joan Crawford as an evil woman both on and off the screen. They were both remarkable in their roles. The one scene from that movie that always makes me shudder with slight fear is Baby Jane serving the dead / cooked Rat to Joan Crawford (who as we both know was confined to a wheelchair). It makes my blood curdle with just the thought of it. I am hoping that you are doing well and that you can conquer your medical dilemna(s). Good Luck Cookie !!

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  12. Joyce at |

    Does anyone know of a book or film which deal with DID/BPD (dissasociative or boderline personality disorder/split) which isn’t about a murderer, but a sex addict/womanizer–they are pretty common in real life–but not seem in novels or films?

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  13. Brittany at |

    I read the book Shutter Island and they never made it really clear if Teddy was in fact hallucinating or what…

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  14. Arun at |

    You missed one of the most intriguing movies ever made on multiple-personality disorder: Black Swan

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    1. Shell Harris at |

      I believe that movie came out after this list was written. Good choice though, you are right.

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  15. Taylor at |

    Frankie and Alice

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