18 Responses

  1. Steve at |

    A well-written list, and very interesting!

    Reply
  2. Dan at |

    Richard the Lionheart died in battle due to an arrow from an average peasant… he did NOT die a captive…

    Reply
    1. Xavier at |

      A child nonetheless! Also, he was extremely reckless and not at all that honorable.

      Reply
  3. Tom at |

    Great list!

    Reply
  4. Diablo135 at |

    I have to say, this article wasa extremely well written…a nice change of pace on the Internet. I ran across it while suring. Very interesting.

    I thought the Lionheart died from a crossbow wound too?

    Dr. Ostryzniuk, if you read this, can you clear that up?

    Reply
    1. Dan at |

      I’m not the man you requested, but it is WELL hystorically documented he died from a (arrow/crossbow?) to the chest while surveying a besiged fort. He was well known to “lead from the front” and frequently surveyed the front of sieges to moralize his men. On his death beath, he pardoned the peasant who shot him from execution, who was later killed anyway. This is all easily googled and documented. I really enjoyed this article, but the bewilderingly innaccurate information for Richard has forced me to now question all I read on these awesome sites lol

      Reply
  5. Libra at |

    You omitted the greatest knight of all–Jean Parisot de la Valette who in 15 65 as Grand Master of the Kingts Hospitaller sucessfully fought off the Turkish siege of Malta against a force of almost 50,000 with about 6,000, many of whom were civilians. Valletta the capital of Malta is named for him. Valette was 70 years at the time.

    Reply
    1. merl at |

      They do that all of the time. He could have filled out the list with actual people instead of tossing in fictional ones.

      Reply
  6. Steven M. Forgette at |

    In my opinion, one of the greatest Knights who ever lived was ‘The Chevalier Bayard, (Pierre Turrail). He did not make your list. He was a real Knight and was considered to be one of the last ‘True Knights.’ If you do just a little bit of reaearch on his life, I think that you will find it as fascinating as I did. As far as I am concerned, he ranks right up there with ‘ Sir William Marshal.’

    Reply
  7. Steven M. Forgette at |

    Just a little correction and some information. The Chevalier Bayard name was Pierre Terail. He was born in 1476 and was killed in battle in 1524. He fought in many battles and was considered to be among the most ‘Truly Chivalrous’ of Knights. He was so well renowned that the King of France, request that he receive his own Knighthood from this most gallant Knight. He was known as ‘The Knight without Fear and above Reproach.’ However, he himself preferred the more humble title of simply, Le bon Chevalier or ‘The Good Knight.’

    Reply
  8. Nigel at |

    Your information on Richard the Lionheart is wayyyyyy off.
    He was king when he left on the crusade
    He was captured and ransomed for an astronomical fortune by Leopold
    He returned to England as King. But died not long after, as others pointed out after being shot by a crossbow bolt during the siege of a relatively minor castle in Northern France (most of which was occupied by the English at the time).

    This is all very common knowledge.

    I’m baffled where you go the idea he went on crusade due to fear or his father or the dying in captivity part!

    Reply
    1. merl at |

      A minor castle with a lot of loot.

      Reply
  9. Jacco at |

    Godfrey of Bouillon is Belgian, not French. Just saying

    Reply
    1. Alice at |

      he is Belgian. I got marked down on my essay because I wrote he was French.

      Reply
  10. merl at |

    Instead of mentioning fictional characters, you could have filled out this list with at least two of the Sires DeCoucy, Enguerrand the III and Raoul the I

    Reply
  11. Jay at |

    Zawisza Czarny z Garbowa (Zawisza the Black of Garbów, also known as the Black Knight; c. 1379 in Stary Garbów, Poland – 1428 in Golubac, Serbian Despotate), Sulima Coat of Arms, was a Polish knight and nobleman. He served as a soldier and diplomat under the Polish king W?adys?aw II and Hungarian-Bohemian king Sigismund of Luxembourg. During his life, he was regarded as a model of knightly virtues and was renowned for winning multiple tournaments. His nickname is due to his black hair and his custom-made, black armor, which is kept at the Jasna Góra Monastery.

    Reply
  12. Baba at |

    No Robert the Bruce? Surely he should be on that list.

    Reply
  13. Thormod Morrisson at |

    I find it hard to believe that Robert the Bruce is not in this list, as he was recognised even by his enemies as ‘the foremost knight in Christendom.’

    Reply

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