21 Responses

  1. badcanuckistani at |

    How about Waco, Heaven’s Gate, Jonestown . These involved more delusion than most of the sections in this article. The Boyd massacre appears to be along the lines of ritual cannibalism, a practice that appeared in many cultures world wide. This article appears to focus more on perpetuating the stereotypical and ignorant view of mental illness. How about the slave trade or Fascism, the delusional view that there are people in the world who are less valuable than others. You want delusion, check out Joseph Stalin who was responsible for the deaths of millions. Keep reinforcing ignorance, it does the world good.

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    1. Nixcell at |

      Oh, get over yourself. Narcissism anyone?

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      1. Jizzamie at |

        Haha…..my favorite part is, “The Boyd massacre appears to be along the lines of ritual cannibalism, a practice that appeared in many cultures world wide.” I guess that makes it okay…….

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  2. joe at |

    What about the German man who posted an add on a website looking to cannibalize someone, after finding an equally insane man wishing to be eaten the met at the eaters house where the two had several hours of gay sex followed by the eater biting of the eatees pens and placing his body in a bathtub while reading a star trek book to the dying man, after he died the corpse was devoured

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    1. Jizzamie at |

      For real?

      Reply
  3. JimmyMorgan, UX News (@hfjm) at |

    Top 10 Shocking Cases Of Delusional Behavior http://j.mp/nmUzeV

    Reply
  4. Daytonlibrary (@Daytonlibrary) at |

    10 shocking cases of delusional behaviour: http://t.co/PejEbLB Research psychological problems further at your local branch

    Reply
  5. A BiPolar Guy at |

    these are mostly not delusional behavior. #8 is a type of OCD. no delusion is involved. #7 you demonstrated no delusion. If he thought she was alive, it’s delusional. But he may have been perfectly aware of reality, but having a bizarre fetish and other things. #6 is depression. This is not a delusion. If you want to say the fact they think it’s not worth going on is a delusion you are really stretching it. But suicide is not about delusional beliefs it’s about deep and abiding sadness/loss of interest in everything/feelings of worthlessness, and other deeply negative feelings.
    #5, 3,2 what’s delusional here? Neither killing people, robbing them, or even eating them needs to have any delusional basis. I’m not saying these people were not disturbed or insane. I’m saying that the stories as reported include no delusional beliefs. Some do these things because of “voices’ or imagined threats, etc others do these things because they have an enormously violent and aggressive nature (maybe due to mental illness) but they are perfectly aware of the facts and nature of the world.

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  6. BryanJ at |

    A delusion is a false belief held with absolute conviction despite superior evidence. Delusions typically occur in the context of neurological or mental illness, although they are not tied to any particular disease and have been found to occur in the context of many pathological states (both physical and mental). However, they are of particular diagnostic importance in psychotic disorders including schizophrenia, paraphrenia, manic episodes of bipolar disorder, and psychotic depression.

    Although non-specific concepts of madness have been around for several thousand years, the psychiatrist and philosopher Karl Jaspers was the first to define the three main criteria for a belief to be considered delusional in his 1913 book General Psychopathology. These criteria are certainty (held with absolute conviction), incorrigibility (not changeable by compelling counterargument or proof to the contrary), and impossibility or falsity of content (implausible, bizarre or patently untrue.
    All of the entries appear to fit to me.

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    1. A BiPolar Guy at |

      I stand by my comments. I don’t see what beliefs the people in the examples I cited have that fits the definition you cited. If there were such beliefs you left them out.
      I am not ignorant in this area, having studied mental illness rather extensively for a layman, motivated by my own bipolar disorder and other illness in various family members. My psychiatrist took to calling me “her scientist” because of the depth to which I took my interest.

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  7. Saddamtron at |

    Breivik is crazy, not delusional. His “manifesto,” is against multculturalism, Communists, Socialists,and most of all, “the Cultural Marxists.” He also glorifies people of the past, who fought against Islamic invaders. Charles the Hammer, Richard the Lionheart, and er, VLAD THE INPALER. The inspiration for Dracula. There. I told you he`s crazy. And as for deluded behaviour, you only need to look at Colonel Gaddafi. “No protests-at all-my people love me!”

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  8. Jessy at |

    I think all these people like to argue too much.
    I enjoyed this article! i ignore the heading often, rather just taking an idea from it!
    Any person that goes out to go kill is delusional in my point!!

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    1. A BiPolar Guy at |

      I believe in truth and rational argument. tell me what the delusions are or admit the people in this article are not all delusional. it must meet the definition of delusional, not just merely be false, or mistaken. Everyone has at least a few false or mistaken beliefs – that’s not what delusional means.

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      1. Jezzika at |

        Oky, so by your logic, the title should be called ”top ten shocking cases of delusional behavior in my point of view”
        Cannibalism, practiced by some part of the world as religion but in modern day USA, majority of Europe, and Australia, it’s seen frowned Upon, or ablest bizarre, so in this context we can be forgiven to believe that such things like a man going and massacring tourists, or another man killing children and teenagers, or simply reaching over and stabbing a man to death, is intact delusional.
        Sure they may have had a reason for doing it, but for the most part we have no idea what drove them to do/be the way they are therefore, from OUR point of view, it’s makes them delusional.
        Thank you =]

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        1. A BiPolar Guy at |

          You really have no I sea what the word delusional means, do you?

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    2. Jizzamie at |

      I totally agree, if there’s anything I’ve learned about this site, it’s that people want to pick over every single thing. Get over yourselves.

      Reply
  9. anon at |

    i think you’re using a very loose colloquial definition of delusion here.

    from a clinical perspective #9 is definitely delusion 8 and 7 could be and 10 also perhaps but really there is no way of knowing.

    psychopathy has no inherent connection to delusions, it refers to a lack of ability to empathise with others and control behavioural impulses, but a person could be delusional and psychopathic at the same time. i think possibly you meant psychosis which defined primarily by delusions. 5 and 3 would lie somewhere on the line between psychotic and psychopathic i would think.

    2 is purely an act of war. you could argue the behaviour of the europeans in their revenge attack was just as ‘deusional’

    1 the perpetrator is no more delusional than any other terrorist. their actions and reasoning are logical but callous.

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  10. tassie devil at |

    While I find the recent massacre in Norway absolutely terrible I am also disturbed that teenagers (some as young as 12) were attending a socialist summer camp. Indoctrination of children into political parties is absolutely disgusting. Teaching your children to be satisfied working their lives in menial jobs and to shed ambition is tantamount to child abuse. I would rather be dead than live a life like that.

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  11. YouRang? at |

    BryanJ, it’s good to read another list of yours. I see you still can’t create a list and a title that go together. Seriously, about five of these seem to show delusiohnal behavior. But you always find fasci9nating items and I just view your lists as collections of miscellany. And in that light, they’re darn good lists!

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  12. Peter Boucher at |

    I would give a nod of approval for this particular list, but you forgot the infamous Rasputin

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  13. James Smith João Pessoa, Brazil at |

    When it comes to delusional behavior, you could point to any religion. When people accept anything as being true with no supporting evidence and much evidence against it, what could be more delusional?

    Most of the problems of the world are, and always have been, caused by religion. For example, Northern Ireland, the Middle East, 9/11, and family planning clinic bombing in the USA. Then there were the crusades, the inquisition, witch burnings, and the dark ages. Get the idea?

    Humanity will never truly be free until the black yoke of religion is lifted by the clear light of truth and rational thinking.

    Reply

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