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9 Responses

  1. redstick
    redstick at |

    Wow. “One folk, one nation, one — drink”? Creepy on a breath-taking level….

    Reply
    1. FMH
      FMH at |

      That’s just an illustration, it’s not real.

      Reply
      1. redstick
        redstick at |

        You are absolutely right. A look at Adbranch.com shows that, while there were many Coke ads at the ’36 Olympics, this was not one of them. A fake.

        Reply
        1. redstick
          redstick at |

          Whoops. Me again. A link at the Adbranch site shows Coke-sponsored decks of airplane spotter playing cards, issued in WWII. So I guess the Coke folks redeemed themselves.

          Reply
          1. FMH
            FMH at |

            I wouldn’t call it “redeemed”. in 1936, Germany wasn’t at war with anyone important to the US, so companies still traded freely. The Olympic games were used by the Nazis to show the world that they were actually very nice – and most nations were somehow fooled for two years.

            Reply
        2. FMH
          FMH at |

          I just guessed from the facts that Arial type was invented in the 80s, Coke would have never been allowed to use an official NSDAP slogan and the overall style is completely different from 1930s posters.

          Reply
        3. FMH
          FMH at |

          And the bad German, of course. You can’t just leave the dots on an Umlaut away. It’s Getränk not Getrank. Furthermore, Coca Cola is never referred to as “coke” in German – exempt in modern commercials for some reason.

          Reply
  2. FMH
    FMH at |

    A German skeptic radio show once claimed that the acid in Coke doesn’t harm the teeth. You could probably call this overskeptizism.

    Reply
  3. Cat Skyfire
    Cat Skyfire at |

    The Eepybird guys, who made the Diet Coke and Mentos experiment popular, said that they used Diet Coke because it was less sticky. That is, regular sugared Coke would’ve been stickier.

    Reply

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