28 Responses

  1. tassie devil at |

    This list should be titled “Photos of situations that shaped america”. None of these photos (possibly No.6) shaped the USA, it’s the situation that is captured that changed your country.

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  2. Little Sam at |

    You forgot the picture of the naked little girl running down the streets during the Vietnam War. That picture should be in the top ten somewhere. Other than that, good job!!

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  3. Jeremy at |

    That’s not Niel Armstrong. It’s Apollo 15 Lunar Module Pilot James Irwin.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_15

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  4. Randy at |

    Great list. There are so many photographs that could be on here. I’d have given myself an anuerism if I tried to do this list.

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  5. Benny the Icepick at |

    I, too, am surprised there aren’t any Vietnam War photos. Either Eddie Adams’s “General Nguyen Ngoc Loan Executing a Viet Cong Prisoner in Saigon” or, as mentioned previously, Nick Ut’s photo of Phan Thá»? Kim Phúc running from the napalm attack on Trang Bang.

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  6. Dan at |

    hey wat about wen they raised the flag on iwo jima??

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  7. Randy at |

    I was thinking the Iwo Jima as well. Also none from the Oklahoma bombing. The one with the fire fighter carrying the baby out of the rubble.

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  8. Kei Dub at |

    This was obviously hastily done, this wasnt about photos that shaped America so much as events. The photos shown of some events arent the iconic ones recognized by Americans. Also, how the flag raising on Iwo Jima is not in the top three I dont know, seeing as how it immediately became the icon for American victory everywhere.

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  9. Mike D. at |

    Wheres the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima?

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  10. Bryan at |

    From Entry 4
    “The three most referenced images include the Conference of the Big Three at Yalta, which shows Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Premier Josef Stalin in February of 1945. The Flag Raising on Iwo Jima is probably the most well known American photo in existence, while the picture taken of a happy couple celebrating the end of the war with a kiss in New York City is iconic. For this article, I have selected a war photo that was captured on June 6, 1944 (D-Day), as American soldiers swarmed the beaches of Normandy.”

    One thing this article is not is hastly done. In selecting the photographs, I wanted to use pictures that might be unknown to some Americans. Everyone has seen the Iwo Jima photo hundreds of times, but the other live action shot of D-Day is less known, but as influential in the long run. I mentioned the other photographs throughout the text because I understood that people would want them recognized. For those people who say that these pictures didn’t shape America, I disagree. If I wanted to I could make an article showing the most recognizable images in American history.

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  11. Jeremy at |

    Hey, opinions will differ. Good on you for taking a thoughtful stab at it!

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  12. Mike D. at |

    ‘One thing this article is not is hastly done. In selecting the photographs, I wanted to use pictures that might be unknown to some Americans. Everyone has seen the Iwo Jima photo hundreds of times, but the other live action shot of D-Day is less known, but as influential in the long run. I mentioned the other photographs throughout the text because I understood that people would want them recognized. For those people who say that these pictures didn’t shape America, I disagree. If I wanted to I could make an article showing the most recognizable images in American history.’

    ok, then you should have titled this article ’10 Pictures that you may not have seen, that shaped America’ The live action shot of D-Day has nothing on the Raising of the flag at Iwo Jima.

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  13. Bryan at |

    It could be 10 Pictures that Helped Shape America, instead of “Top Ten,” but long titles aren’t usually user or Google freindly.
    Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood
    Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu

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    1. TopTenz Master at |

      I agree Brian, I’m changing the title.

      Reply
  14. K at |

    I enjoyed reading this, I’m British, alot of people over here are abit snobby about America but I think it’s a brilliant place and American history is fascinating, you should all be proud to be American. The 9/11 photos still give me goosebumps and make me feel sick, it’s so tragic, RIP to all those poor people who lost their lives on that horrific day!

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  15. Bryan at |

    The Little Round Top to Devil’s Den doesn’t show a Union soldier looking down at Devil’s Den, as explained in the entry. That’s a statue of General Gouverneur K. Warren, which is still there. The photograph even shows the little sign that’s still there telling people not to climb up on the rock.

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    1. TopTenz Master at |

      Thanks, Bryan. The author as edited the article to reflect this change.

      Reply
  16. wildelycreative at |

    The Dorothea Lange picture was staged. She asked the children to look away. Many of the pictures taken during that time were staged. A shame for the people so badly affected by the Depression.

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  17. Scott Bulger at |

    The first permanent photograph was indeed created by Joseph Nicephore Niepce in about 1826, but it was called “View from the Window at Le Gras” and was just a bunch of roofs outside his window. “Boulevard du Temple” is generally considered the first photograph of a person, and was made by Louis Daguerre in about 1838.

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  18. zak at |

    Neat list, here’s a few I felt should’ve at least been mentioned: some affected us directly, others came back to haunt us

    The infamous Colonel Loan and a Viet Cong Prisoner photo:
    http://www.cs.brown.edu/courses/cs024/images/canon/06.jpg

    The Afghani Girl:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sharbat_Gula.jpg

    Couple embracing on V-J Day:
    http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/VJ-Day.jpg

    Separate Drinking Fountains:
    http://whereintheworldispatty.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/black-and-colored-drinking-water1.jpg

    Aftermath of Gettysburg (first widely distributed U.S. war photos):
    http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~historyofmarlborough/gettysburg.jpg

    Mushroom Cloud over Hiroshima:
    http://www.laprogressive.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/HiroshimaAtomicBomb_02.gif

    The Falling Man(9/11):
    http://www.channel4.com/assets/programmes/images/911-the-falling-man/911-the-falling-man-20090515123420_625x352.jpg

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  19. zak at |
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  20. zak at |

    What about The Falling Man at the WTC?

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  21. Shari Davis at |

    Great post. I’m searching for photos (specifically of American flags) to use as history trivia questions for my students. I found this post that highlights a few of the same events you did:
    http://www.allstarflags.com/facts/Top-10-American-Flag-Moments-in-History/

    You might find it useful for a future post!

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    1. Bryan at |

      That is some interesting stuff. Nice suggestion.

      Reply
  22. Aaron at |

    Um? why isnt the flag raising in iwo jima not up there?

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    1. TopTenz Master at |

      The author explained this in response to comments above. He decided to focus on less known pictures. As the site editor, I probably should have titled it differently.

      Reply
  23. The Fish at |

    Kents State? Earth rise from Apollo 8? Firefighters and police officers carrying Fr. Michael Judge from the ruins on 9/11?

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  24. SPKBOS at |

    So so good! Great post…

    Thank you for the pix and the detailed note.

    Nice Job!

    Reply

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