Author: Larry Holzwarth

Before the Second World War, a nation’s pride and status was reflected in the power of the force demonstrated by its navy, with battleships being the epitome of military strength at sea. Battleships were expensive as well as impressive, immense steel floating fortresses built to fight each other in the ultimate argument over control of…

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It was American involvement in the Second World War which led to the selection of the site known to the world as Camp David as a presidential retreat. President Hoover had established a rustic camp in Virginia during his administration, purchasing it with his own money and donating it to the government, but the camp was…

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It was the largest combined effort of the human race up to that time, and possibly for all time, as the globe locked into the conflagration which was the Second World War. So it is not unusual that many events transpired which fit under the description of being strange. It would have been unusual if…

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In July 1969 – five decades ago, and just eight years after President Kennedy challenged the United States to land a man on the moon – Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin accomplished the task to international fanfare. They were of course just the tip of the sword. The lunar landings were a massive accomplishment, supported…

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When the soldiers of Rome first encountered the Sphinx they gazed upon an ancient structure which was already older than the ruins of the ancient Roman Empire are today. Staring with mouths no doubt agape in wonder, they likely formulated questions which for over two millennia have remained largely unanswered. What was it? Who built…

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Despite the current debate over sources exerting undue influence on elections in America, and regardless of one’s level of outrage over reports of such influence, the use of less than savory activities to sway voters is been as American as cherry pie, as history plainly recounts. Means which were legal, quasi-legal, or clearly illegal have…

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The Smithsonian Institution is often called America’s attic, and within its vast collections can be found items ranging from mundane to utterly unique. Over 150 million items are contained within the Institution’s collections, scattered throughout its many museums, affiliated museums, temporarily displayed at other locations on loan, or carefully stored. It should be no surprise…

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Americans have always had a love-hate relationships with outlaws, from the folk heroes of the Old West to the Mafiosi of the 20th century and beyond. Jesse James was the subject of dime novels depicting him as a heroic figure long before he was killed by Bob Ford. Wyatt Earp was well acquainted with both…

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In 1797 an act of Congress created the United States Navy and authorized the construction of six frigates to fill the role of its capital ships. Three of the frigates were designed to be the heaviest and most powerfully armed ships of their type ever built. They were President, United States, and Constitution. A fourth,…

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The history of civilization is replete with examples of humanity improving the world in which it lives. Through ingenuity, imagination, and hard work, humanity has spanned rivers, built roads, erected cities, and created the infrastructure to connect them. Some projects took centuries to complete; others were finished with alacrity, driven by immediate needs. Many were…

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